Unions - Managerial Prerogative

In: Business and Management

Submitted By casseastabrook
Words 2108
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Employment relations essay
“Management should have the right to determine whether a union should operate within their workplace” Discuss.
Due April 27, 9AM
By cassidy Eastabrook
2171192
Due April 27, 9AM
By cassidy Eastabrook
2171192

Introduction
Unions have been a heavily debated topic in Australian workplaces for decades. Some see unions as unnecessary evils, interfering with employee obedience and trustworthiness, the overall employment relationship and an organisation’s practices. On the contrary, many other employers and employees see unions as a channel for collective bargaining and better employee representation. Throughout the years of debates one question has remained prominent, “Should management be able to dictate whether or not a union should function within their workplace?”. This question is, of course, controversial resulting in their being no clear cut answer. On one hand, some may argue that should management have this right, organisations may experience increased managerial prerogative, boosted productivity and performance and decreased levels of conflict. However, on the other hand, critics disagree, stating that whilst this may be the case, the overall wellbeing of employees will suffer as they are taken advantage of through individual contracting. This essay aims to delve into both perspectives; the perspective of management and the perspective of the employee and identify more clearly the benefits, as well as the drawbacks of this increase in managerial prerogative.

The role of unions
A union (also referred to as a trade or labour union) can be defined as an independent organisation of employees, who work together to conciliate disputes and negotiate in order to achieve common goals for themselves and on behalf of other workers within the industry (Australian Worker’s Union 2016;…...

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