Types of Philosophy

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By shanzzy
Words 1281
Pages 6
Unit 1 Individual Project
While not being a philosophical person even a little, I am enjoying the learning process of philosophy. My main focus and interest in life has always been science in some realm or another. But with all good sciences, there lies an underlying truth of what is right, what is wrong; what is real, what is imaginary; what is innate, what is learned. This is where philosophy comes into play. Although I have not had the privilege of having many situations where the big questions have presented themselves, I will share what knowledge I have in my possession.
Metaphysics
I can relate to the subject of metaphysics more closely than the other areas of philosophy due to my scientific mindset. One of my favorite subjects is astronomy. Theoretical physics is one of the most fascinating jobs/careers a person could have. Not all of astronomy is theoretical, but a vast majority is since scientists are unable to physically study the universe due to human constraints. Traversing through the universe would be the ideal adventure and I would be the first to sign up.
Now who are we to say that the universe is real or isn’t real. We can’t touch it, we can’t put it under a microscope and dissect the particles. We can, though, observe and base our knowledge on the observations and calculations made with each study made. Studying many aspects of the universe and putting this information together also seems to help make the universe more real in our minds.
Epistemology
The topic of epistemology remains, for me, a wondrous subject. How do we know what we know? How did learning become something humans experience on a daily basis? This is a difficult topic to digest. Some of the things that I know have been acquired from experience and some of the things that I know I am unsure where the knowledge came from. I believe some of it comes about subconsciously as I…...

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