The Mediating Affect of Crf Within the Central Nucleus of the Amygdala in Rats

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The Mediating Affect of CRF Within the Central Nucleus of the Amygdala in Rats
1.Summarize the background of the article, and how does it relate to the general article.
Alcohol consumption is characterized by excessive consumption which leads to feelings of increased anxiety and other negative emotional states.Consequently, these emotions lead to further consumption.Similar to human alcoholics, ethanol- dependent animals show signs of anxiety like behaviors and self administrate ethanol during periods of withdrawal. CRF, also known as corticotropin releasing factor helps mediate the increased anxiety during withdrawal.Additionally,regions of the amygdala are comprised of the CRF system, although unknown where the specific sites are responsible for the CRF component of excessive drinking. Also, numerous studies have shown that the amygdala is involved in “mediating the behavioral and physiological responses associated with anxiety.”
This relates to the general article which focuses on the consumption of drug and alcohol, triggering feelings of anxiety which can be quieted by consuming more of it.Specifically, the amygdala is the part of the brain where the feelings of anxiety are triggered. Moreover, new research is showing alcohol's involvement in the transformation of the chemical architecture of the brain, allowing the brain's stress response to contribute to its dependency. CRF, also known as the corticotrophin releasing factor, is a chemical that is involved in the brain's stress response. Through substance consumption, CRF is triggered, helping the brain to return to its normal state after experiencing significant amounts of pleasure.However, too much alcohol and drug use causes the brain's stress response to go into overdrive and transitions from feeling moments of pleasure to feelings of pain, known as anxiety. As soon as the person is temporarily…...

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