Sonnet 130

In: English and Literature

Submitted By Narges
Words 411
Pages 2
THE LARAMIE PROJECT
On Thursday February 24 the students of went to watch 'The Laramie Project', which was located in in the Jetpack. Laramie is about a small town, a gay college student; Matthew Sheppard, who was found tied to a fence after being brutally beaten and left there to die. The play talks about the death of Matthew, the parents, and the trial.
The students of Victoria Park said " the play was very touching and the acting of the play was astonishing". The play was well done, the lighting, sound effects, acting, and costumes was spectacular. But, the play could've been even better by making the setting more clear. The students remarked " we couldn't understand the beginning very well. Until it got to the middle of the play it was clear to us."
There was one scene in the play that caught everyone's attention. It was when Matthew Sheppard's killers Aaron James McKinney and Russel Arthur Henderson were explaining how they killed Matthew. Matthew Sheppard was in a bar and he got drunk. He asked Aaron and Russel for a ride, they gave him one. In the car Matthew was talking to Aaron and was going up his leg, that's when Aaron got mad at beat him brutally. They both tied Matthew against a fence and beat him even more, they left him there to die.
The acting that was done for Aaron James McKinney was done very well. It was like the actress was actually Aaron because it sounded and looked so real. The vocal clarity was excellent, the actress was talking so clear and loud. The actress had changed her voice in to a man's voice that it was so real. The audience was so shocked at how amazing the actress acted. This play got a lot of students in tears. The costumes were amazing, the actress was wearing a baseball cap a big hoodie and baggy jeans.
This scene would've been even better if Russel Arthur Henderson was also there explaining how they killed Matthew…...

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