Rape in the United States

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Rape in the United States
April Sexton
Rasmussen College

Rape in the United States A major social problem in the United States is rape and sexual assault. Studies show that one in six American women are victims of rape, and every two and a half minutes someone is raped in the United States. That is alarming! Studies also show that more than half, 59% to be exact, of all rapes go unreported (RAINN, 2007). What is rape and why is it so common in America? Why are so many victims of rape and sexual assault not reporting it to authorities? In this paper I plan to answer and address these questions, and many more in depth issues involving rape such as male and lesbian rape survivors, incest, post traumatic stress disorder, and rape trauma syndrome.

Rape and Sexual Assault Rape is forced sexual intercourse, including vaginal, anal, or oral penetration. Penetration can be by an object or by a body part. Rape victims may be forced through physical means or threats. Anyone can be a victim of rape: women, men or children, straight or gay. A rapist uses violence or force, or the threat of it, to take control over someone. Rape is a crime across the United States, whether the person committing it is an intimate, a date, a stranger, an acquaintance, or a family member. Sexual assault is unwanted sexual contact that stops just short of rape or attempted rape, which includes fondling and sexual touching. Of the 200,780 victims in 2004-2005, about 64,080 were victims of completed rape, 51,500 were victims of attempted rape, and 85,210 were victims of sexual assault (WOAR, 2003). Rape and sexual assault are one of the most underreported crimes in America. Victims of rape and sexual assault are encouraged to report the crime to bring the perpetrator to justice. Males are the least likely to report rape or a sexual assault, even though it is…...

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