Postmodernism in Delillo & Churchill

In: English and Literature

Submitted By ansclo
Words 983
Pages 4
In this essay I want to examine how postmodernism is used throughout Don Delillo's White Noise and Caryl Churchill's Top Girls. Although each of the texts are very dissimilar they both concentrate on restrictions in society, yet open up a whole new perspective to what these oppressive values really do represent. Postmodern novels are known to be published after the Second World War. It was after the 19th century that modernism was introduced, where the constraints from society's values were rebelled against. However, in the last few decades, there is an evident change that had occurred. Modernism focuses upon values that are oppressing in society, such as class, politics, race and gender. Yet, postmodernism doesn't focus on these aspects in a way that is challenging them; it focuses more on a utopian idea of the world. It is where these constraints are not just acknowledged, but disregarded as they shouldn't seem to matter simply because boundaries in society shouldn't be an issue. Don Delillo's White Noise, was first published in 1984 and it looks into how the world is changing through the medium of popular culture, the media and most importantly, technology. The reader is exposed to this through the eyes of the protagonist, Jack Gladney who is a professor of Hitler studies in a university. A major theme that occurs throughout the novel is the subject of death. We see that Jack has a great fear of death. However, in one of Jacks lectures he unexpectedly confronts this fear by saying, 'All plots tend to move deathward.' [1] Here we can use postmodernism to understand the underlying meanings of this quote. In the majority of literary works, a plot is defined as a chain of events in which a character experiences to move to towards a final resolution or not in some cases, but it should lead to an ending. Yet, the reader discovers that Jack has a distorted view of the…...

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