Plato's Philosophy

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By mariahmariahXD
Words 880
Pages 4
Gradiene S. Tandoc
Mariah Janey Vicente

PLATO’S WORKS and WRITINGS

Plato wrote extensively and most of his writings survived. His works are in the form of dialogues, where several characters argue a topic by asking questions of each other.

Why do you think Plato choose this form of writing (dialogue)?
These may be the possible reasons:

1. This form allows Plato to raise various points of view and let the reader decide which is valid. 2. The use of character and conversation allowed Plato to awaken the interest of his readers and therefore to reach a wider audience. 3. The dialogue form allows Plato's evident interest in pedagogical questions (how is it possible to learn? what is the best way to learn? from what sort of person can we learn? what sort of person is in a position to learn?) to be pursued not only in the content of his compositions but also in their form. 4. Plato evidently enjoys creating a sense of puzzlement among his readers, and the dialogue form is uniquely suited to this goal.

CHRONOLOGY

The exact order in which Plato's dialogues were written is not known, nor is the extent to which some might have been later revised and rewritten. However, there is enough information internal to the dialogues to form a rough chronology. The dialogues are normally grouped into three fairly distinct periods, with a few of them considered transitional works. The generally agreed upon modern ordering is as follows: early, middle, and late dialogues.

Early Dialogues
In these dialogues, Socrates is the central character, and is believed to be expressing his own views. These are the only remaining record of Socrates' teachings; hence these are known as the Socratic dialogues (this group of dialogues deals with the common theme of virtue and whether or not it can be taught).
The dialogues from this period are as follows: *…...

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