Organisational Theory

In: Business and Management

Submitted By sheenaphua
Words 3094
Pages 13
Introduction

Organization theory is the study of organizations to identify problem solving technics, increase productivity and achieving the goals of stakeholders. There are four perspectives of organization theory namely modern, symbolic-interpretive, critical and postmodern perspectives. In this essay, we will look into organizations from a modern and critical perspective and through it; develop an in-depth understanding of a detailed analysis on how power, control and resistance play a part in an organization. In comparison to the two chosen perspectives, we will spot its similarities and differences by doing a compare and contrast analysis. The fundamentals of this will help us apply the perspectives and theory to Apple and its organizational environment.
Theoretical Framework
In order for us to do a comparison of the perspectives, we need to study the differences between epistemology and ontology to help us understand the modernism ways better. Ontology is concerned with what we perceived reality to be. Our assumption will decide on the subjects to be treated as real while disregarding others. These assumptions on whether or not a particular phenomenon exists or if it is just an illusion stirs debates between those who have conflicting perspectives. On the other hand, epistemology is concerned with knowledge that we are able to attain. The answers an epistemologist would want to derive from are are: how we as humans obtain the knowledge, how we differentiate between knowledge that is good and bad and how reality should be explained. Epistemology is directly linked to ontology as the answers derived from these questions are dependent on the ontology perceptions of what they deem reality to be. To a modernist, ontology is described as objectivism- The belief that existence of reality depends on those who are living in it. People respond to their…...

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