Nursing Theorists

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Submitted By timack
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Nursing Theorist
Timothy Mack
University of Phoenix
Theories and Models of Nursing Practice
NUR/403
Judith Mc Leod
July 25, 2010

Nursing Theorist
The theorist that I have chosen is Dorothea Orem. This theory describes the role of nursing in helping a patient’s who can no longer care for themselves (Mosby, 2009). The theory is divided into three parts; universal, developmental, and health deviation.
Orem’s Theory
The universal portion of Orem’s theory consists of the self care that a patient needs to meet their physiologic and psychosocial need. The developmental portion of the theory covers the care when coping through developmental stages, and the health deviation, which cover the care a patient need when theory health has deviated from their normal state.
Theory History
Dorothea Orem was born in Baltimore Maryland in 1914. After receiving a diploma in nursing, she attended the Providence Hospital School of Nursing earning a BSN degree in 1939. In 1945 he received the MSN degree from Catholic University of America.
Dorothea Orem developed her theory in 1959, with the purpose of guiding nurses to assist patients in performing self care. The nurse was to assess the reasons the patient could not perform tasks of their self care and to assess them in discovering ways the patient will be able to meet their self care needs (Potter & Perry, 2009).
Orem’s model was designed to assess nurses in assisting a patient to be able to care for their needs. Orem’s theory was created using inductive thinking that was drawn from her experiences in nursing practice. She also believed that nursing use applied knowledge from multiple disciplines and that this knowledge was continually formulated and validated through the work of theorist (Alligood, 2010). Orem also believed that the goal of nursing was to help to overcome human limitations, and to have the…...

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