Matter and Materials

In: Other Topics

Submitted By BlondeZebra
Words 1363
Pages 6
u2015
2015
Physical Sciences
HArtbeespoort highschool
Physical Sciences
HArtbeespoort highschool
Lijani van Wyk de Vries
Matter and materials
Lijani van Wyk de Vries
Matter and materials

Effects of intermolecular forces on physical properties

A. Effects of intermolecular forces on evaporation:

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Investigative Question
What is the relation between intermolecular forces and evaporation, and what are the effects thereof?
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Hypothesis
I think water will have the highest vapour pressure, and acetone the lowest, and thus that the substance with the strongest intermolecular forces will have the lowest vapour pressure.
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Variables
INDEPENDENT: substance
DEPENDANT: evaporation
CONSTANT: circumstances, amount used (number of drops)
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Record Data and analyze data

SUBSTANCE | TIME IN SECONDS | Ethanol | 83 | Water | No change after one hour (3600 sec) | Acetone | 20 | Methylated Spirits | 90 |

Water (H2O) took the longest to evaporate (having made no difference after more than an hour) – this is because water has strong hydrogen bonds. . The methylated spirits (mainly CH3CH2OH and CH3OH) and ethanol (CH3CH2OH) evaporated completely within just over a minute – due to the hydrogen bonds, which are weaker than that of water. Acetone (CH3COCH3) evaporated almost immediately (20 sec) –because acetone has weak dipole-dipole forces. As the substances evaporated the drop expanded and then decreased and completely disappeared – shrinking in from the outside.
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Results
Water evaporated the slowest. Methylated spirits and ethanol evaporated faster and acetone evaporated the fastest.…...

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