Making Effective and Ethical Decisions

In: Business and Management

Submitted By max2dbone44
Words 1385
Pages 6
Making Effective and Ethical Decisions
Rose Johnson
MGT400_M4_A2
Devry University
April 15, 2013

Making Effective and Ethical Decisions Making ethical decisions requires the ability to make distinctions between competing choices. “Ethical decisions are guided by the underlying values of the individual. Values are principles of conduct such as caring, being honest, showing loyalty, acting with integrity, respecting others, and being a responsible citizen (Bateman, 2009. p.168)”. When conversing concerns of ethical conduct in the office employees must realize that culture plays a massive part on how an individual creates ethical decision. Ethical problems in the office may contribute from incorrect employees’ conduct, which includes stock trading, sexual harassment, account fraud, and participation in conflicts of interest. To accomplish the desires of these strategies, the businesses will create a written principles of ethical behaviors for implementing these strategies, allocate accountability to executive leaders to confirm that the policy is functioning as planned, dismiss any person who disrupts the values from practicing management titles, offer training in ethics to workers, observe compliance, provide employees compensation for obeying the policies and reply with penalties if illegal behavior comes to surface (Healthfield, 2013). The company must consider ethics training in order to take advantage of the ethic policies in place. The ability to make ethical decisions involves divisions between challenging choices. Managers must involve all the evidences when confronted with making ethical conclusions. The organization will modify and monitor the decision, have ample information to back an intelligent decision, laws and regulations written or unwritten that may apply, and stop and think since this will offer numerous advantages…...

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