Kodak Case Study

In: Business and Management

Submitted By gotthegoods
Words 722
Pages 3
Team U
Kodak Case Study
6 July 2010

Provide an overview of the case and the environment that video cameras are competing in today

• Historical: Camcorder sales are traditionally dwarfed by “Still”, or Point-n-click cameras • Digital Still Cameras account for 95% of camera market space • Est. 60m digital cameras sold per year • Est. 4m video cameras, or camcorders sold per year • Still a multi-billion dollar industry • Point-n-clip video records, or “mini cameras”, lead by “FLIP VIDEO” created a surge and have rejuvenated the camcorder market segment • Flip Video is seen as a pioneer in the video camera market • Consumer friendly video solutions • Easy to create, edit, and upload short videos • 2009 – Cisco purchases Pure Digital for $590m • Recognizing that the “user created video” market is exploding, in 2009 Steve Jobs - CEO of Apple, announces “we want to get into this.” • Launches IPOD Nano • Makes rest leaders like Cisco, Sony, Kodak, very nervous • Bundled solutions

Segment the video camera market in the US and identify the demographic, geographic, psychographic and behavioral (product purchase behavior, brand purchase behavior and price sensitivity) of this market.

• Demographic Segment: Targeted directly toward younger generation of YouTube, Facebook, and Myspace Users • Behavioral Segment: Targeted directly toward consumers with active lifestyles and want compact, yet functional video recorders • Soccer Moms • Travel consumers / vacationers / etc • Psychographic Segment: YouTube has created a camcorder evolution from a “dorky dad” device to a sleek pocket-sized gadget. • Geographic Segment: Research has not uncovered on particular geographic segment over another in this market space. • Purchase Timing • While introduction of mini cams are intended to make video recording easier, the “purchase…...

Similar Documents

The Case Study

...The Hexadecimal Company is a medium-sized manufacturing firm supplying computer components to many international computer manufacturers. Initially the company produces traditional computer keyboards, but competition from cheaper labor markets in other countries forced it to change its products. It now licenses OLED (organic light-emitting diodes) technology from Kodak and designs and produces high-tech products such as thin film keyboards for hand-held computers and flexible electronic pages (less than 1/100 inch thick) used in e-books. With John Zoltan as president, the company has experienced rapid growth since its beginning and is now moving into advanced electronics from the electromechanical assembly of the past. John Zoltan recently attended a university executive seminar, and was so impressed that he brought in the professor as an OD practitioner. At one of their meetings, they decided that Zoltan should start an internal OD group to help achieve the organizational excellence he desired for his company. Zoltan ran an ad in the Wall Street Journal, and he and the practitioner selected four young M.B.A.s. These four and one young internal prospects from HR were formed into what was called the OD Group. THE OD GROUP The OD group was housed in an old conference room and began with a high level of enthusiasm and energy. The members of the group ranged in age from 23 to 34. The members were Pete Loomis, 25, M.B.A., a behavioral specialist who had done......

Words: 1186 - Pages: 5

Kodak Case Study

...KODAK case study Kodak’s Performance Today Kodak is in trouble: for the nine months ended 30 September 2005, Eastman Kodak’s revenues increased by only 3% to US$10.07bn and the net-loss from continuing operations totalled US$1.32bn, versus an income of US$139m.6 Last month, film sales for Kodak fell 37% for rolls and 13% in single-use cameras,7 and despite similar shocks affecting the rest of the industry Kodak’s declines were the steepest – versus Fuji's declines of 28% in roll and 5% in single use cameras and other private label's decline of 12% in role and gain of 5% in single use cameras.8 Share loss at Kodak appears to be driven by price as it grapples to increase revenues from an outdated industry, as Big Yellow's roll price increased 5% compared to declines of 9% and 11% for Fuji and Private Labels. What was done wrong? - Kodak used a razor-blade strategy: it sold cameras at a low cost, and film fuelled Kodak’s growth and profits => The business became heavily dependent on this highly profitable margin from film, and progressively paid less attention to equipment. -Kodak’s tried and tested strategy was evident throughout the business – and even in Dental Products. In a similar theme to T. Levitt’s Marketing Myopia16, Kodak’s lack of strategic creativity led it to misinterpret the very line of work and type of industry that it was operating in which was later devastated with a fundamental shift towards the digital age - Strategic problems were tackled......

Words: 447 - Pages: 2

Case Study Case Study Case Study

...This case study is an excellent example of how different types of parties can be brought together in a large scale transaction and how the original energy of those early meetings can be lost over time. I imagine that when Anthony Athanas was purchasing those old piers back in the 1960s many, if not all, of his colleagues, friends, and family members told him that he was off his rocker. I’m sure Athanas was looking at this land as his family’s ticket to financial prosperity and somewhat of a legacy that he could leave to his descendants for years and years to come. One of the items I wish the case would have divulged is the amount of money that Athanas had invested in the properties. For me this information would have given an insight to his net worth and how much he had riding on this investment. I assume it was substantial given his actions later in the process. Twenty years later Athanas’ dreams came true and all those naysayers were more than likely green with envy. The amount of pride Athanas’ had in his investment at that moment had to have been insurmountable. Being approached by a big time real estate development company and their extremely wealthy client, Hyatt Corporation, must have made Athanas feel larger than life and made him feel like something he isn’t, which is a developer himself. The case doesn’t give much insight into whether Athanas had any representation or anyone consulting him throughout the process. From the beginning, I saw this as matchup...

Words: 1190 - Pages: 5

Kodak Case Study

...To: Kelly Johnston, CEO Kodak From: Amelia Morris, Head of Marketing Operations, Kodak In Reference To: A Kodak moment; drawing your attention to major architectural flaws within our company, specifically the MAPP plan, as well as solutions for more sustainable options for future structures. It has come to my attention that there are some major flaws lying inside our organizational architecture. These flaws lay in the foundation of Kodak`s organization structure and so we cannot move forward until these basic errors are corrected. We are seeking companywide success and must act as a company to achieve this. Throughout its history we`ve experienced dramatic economic upturns and downturns. We are currently trying to pull ourselves out of bankruptcy and I believe the way to do so is through changes in our organizational architecture. These changes alone will not lead to success, as we still face problems in the digital technology area however they will certainly contribute positively. This means making changes in performance-evaluation methods, reward systems and responsibility assignments. Our previous attempts; decentralization in 1984 and the MAPP plan in 1987 have been widely unsuccessful. This means we must look closely at what went wrong within these plans, and restructure accordingly. Now, I’d like to specify what the flaws were in our initial organization restructure plans. 1987 saw Kodak change the assignments of decision rights within our company. ......

Words: 1681 - Pages: 7

Case: Kodak

...Case: Kodak’s Organizational Architecture Saint Leo University Abstract: Kodak dominated film and photography for a sustained period of time operating under near monopolistic conditions. During the 1980’s, advances in technology and communications gave birth to competition from Fuji and generic store brands. Kodak’s policies and organizational architecture were shown to be past their prime as Economics Darwinism set in. This paper will discuss factors prompting Kodak to make changes to existing architecture, mistakes made into those changes, and what should have been done differently. Case: Kodak’s Organizational Architecture The market environment in which Kadak operated in witnessed dramatic changes in the 1980s. Competition from Fuji and generic store brands began to erode Kodak’s market power and market share (Brickley, Smith, & Zimmerman, 2009, p. 358). Products such as Fuji’s high-quality film were brought to market within months rather than years because of the industries advances in communication, design capabilities, and robotics (Brickley, Smith, & Zimmerman, 2009, p. 358). The market saw substantial gain during this time frame however Kodak’s share price dropped 16 percent from $85 to $71 in 2 years (Brickley, Smith, & Zimmerman, 2009, p. 358). Kodak’s leadership determined that the company’s existing structure and organizational architecture did not allow for adaptability or responsiveness to market changes (Brickley, Smith, &......

Words: 1319 - Pages: 6

Case Studies

...Managerial Economics Case Studies Institutional Affiliation Managerial Economics Case Studies #1. Three aspects of organizational architecture The three vital components of organizational architecture are: a) assignment of decision rights; b) methods of rewarding individuals; and c) structure of systems to evaluate the performance of both individuals and business units. First, assignment of decision rights involves giving the responsibility of decision-making to top-level executives. It is imperative that an organization is able to delegate the duty of making a decision to a manager who has relevant information and knowledge on the internal and external factors that affects the operations and goals of the organization. The architecture of an organization and its environment will determine who will be the decision-maker for the company. In some organizations, the top-level executive may have them most relevant information and thus, a centralized decision-making process can be adopted. There are instances when the lower-level employees may have the most relevant information, thus, decision-making rights become decentralized. Second, methods of rewarding individuals determine how the organization will provide incentives to its employees. Organizational goals and employee’s productivity play great roles in determining a scheme of remuneration. Some organizations repay their employees through financial rewards such as the monthly wage, and cost of living allowance, and other......

Words: 3165 - Pages: 13

Case Study for Kodak

...1101IBA- Management Concepts Assessment 2: Report Report on Strategic Management at Eastman Kodak Prepared by: Alisiya Bell S2944536 Due Date: Tuesday, 23 September 2014 Word count: 1426 Introduction: Once a great leader and legendary brand in the photographic film industry, Eastman Kodak is now fighting to recover from a tech revolution that is strangling its core business. Kodak Chief Executive Antonio M. Perez is on the road to innovation. Taking in to consideration of the mistakes and lessons learnt from the past, Perez is reinventing the company’s core business model. As Perez reassembled the business he replaced a lot of executives to get the organisation on track. While Perez’s innovation of the organisation could be argued that this will help Kodak recover, there are also many substantial problems that could occur. One major problem for Kodak is the lack of strategic management. Although there are many various ways to define strategic management, David, F.R (2009) defines strategic management as a “continuous process of strategic analysis, strategy creation, implementation and monitoring, used by organisations with the purpose to achieve and maintain a competitive advantage.” Problem Identification: All main business ideas for Kodak seem to come just from the Chief Executive Perez. Leaving a lot of the main strategic planning just up to him. Kodak has previously displayed what an organisation with the absence of strategic management......

Words: 1473 - Pages: 6

Kodak Case

...Kodak Case Analysis 1879: George Eastman invented the dry-plate process and filed patent for a machine that coated dry photographic plates 1880: George Eastman established the Eastman Dry Plate Company, at Rochester N.Y. 1884: Introduced paper roll film 1889: Invented perforated celluloid film 1900: The Brownie box camera went on the market with a price of $1 1935: Introduced color film 1960: Brought the Instamatic camera to the market 1970: Major sales growth for Kodak. Concentrates on film and basic cameras 1980: Fuji emerges as a serious competitor 1994: Kodak abandoned its non-imaging health-related businesses began to invest in digital imaging products for medical practice 1997: Kodak was a high-cost manufacturer with a growing portfolio of digital products which was losing hundreds of millions of dollars annually 1997: Restructuring that eliminated 19,000 jobs and cut more than $1 billion from annual costs 1999: Kodak entered the digital radiography market 2001: Kodak is pushing aggressively into China, an important growth market 2003: Carp unveiled the plan to invest $3 billion in the next three years in digital products by cutting dividends by 72% - to 50 cents per share 2004: Kodak announced that it would stop selling traditional film cameras in Europe and North America, and cut up to 15,000 jobs 2005: The Kodak EasyShare-One Digital Camera, the world’s first Wi-Fi consumer digital camera capable of sending pictures by email, was unveiled 2012: Kodak filed for......

Words: 2482 - Pages: 10

Case Study

...22 Global Vision—The World Is My Oyster CASE 1-1 CASE 1-2 CHAPTER 2 21 23 A Tortuous Road Ahead for Proton of Malaysia 26 Dabur—Developing Values in an Emerging Economy Through Value Chain and Product Line 31 Assessing the Global Marketing Environment—The Global Economy and Technology 36 the global economy 37 Economic Growth and World Trade 37 Who Are the United States’ Major Customers? 38 High Tech Products Lead World Trade 40 Characteristics of High Technology Markets 42 Technology and Global Financial Services 44 vi alo29279_fm_i-xxii.indd vi 12/15/11 10:14 PM Confirming Pages contents global countries and global companies Global Demographics 49 The Green Economy Market Size CHAPTER 3 45 48 the green economy CASE 2-1 vii 49 Fueling Indonesians: Window of Opportunity or Regrets? 54 Evaluating Cultural and Social Environments 59 B I G B R O T H E R ’s big controversy 59 cultural diversity in the era of globalization 61 what is “culture”? 62 Knowing Your Iceberg 62 the concept of national character 64 the role of subcultures 65 hofstede’s 5 dimensions of national culture 66 applying hofstede’s model to global marketing 68 the schwartz value survey 69 global leadership and organizational behavior effectiveness 71 culture and communication 72 nonverbal communication 75 global customers 77 China 77 India 78 CASE 3-1 CASE 3-2 CHAPTER 4 Starbucks:......

Words: 1893 - Pages: 8

Case Study Codac

...Managerial Economics Case Studies Institutional Affiliation Managerial Economics Case Studies #1. Three aspects of organizational architecture The three vital components of organizational architecture are: a) assignment of decision rights; b) methods of rewarding individuals; and c) structure of systems to evaluate the performance of both individuals and business units. First, assignment of decision rights involves giving the responsibility of decision-making to top-level executives. It is imperative that an organization is able to delegate the duty of making a decision to a manager who has relevant information and knowledge on the internal and external factors that affects the operations and goals of the organization. The architecture of an organization and its environment will determine who will be the decision-maker for the company. In some organizations, the top-level executive may have them most relevant information and thus, a centralized decision-making process can be adopted. There are instances when the lower-level employees may have the most relevant information, thus, decision-making rights become decentralized. Second, methods of rewarding individuals determine how the organization will provide incentives to its employees. Organizational goals and employee’s productivity play great roles in determining a scheme of remuneration. Some organizations repay their employees through financial rewards such as the monthly wage, and cost of living allowance, and other......

Words: 1212 - Pages: 5

Kodak Case - This Case Is in Portuguese

...Caso Kodak “Você carrega no botão, nós fazemos o resto” “Share moments. Share life” ÍNDICE NOTA PRÉVIA 3 INTRODUÇÃO 4 CASO EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY: FUNTIME FILM 5 BIBLIOGRAFIA 9 NOTA PRÉVIA No presente trabalho expomos as conclusões que retirámos da nossa análise do caso “Eastman Kodak Company: Funtime Film”, apresentando as mesmas numa estrutura “pergunta – resposta”, de forma a respeitar a sequência que o Professor Dr. João Carlos Rosário nos forneceu. Desta forma, os temas serão apresentados em tópicos numerados, de modo a facilitar a compreensão e a consulta dos temas desejados. INTRODUÇÃO Em primeiro lugar, é importante fazer um enquadramento histórico da Eastman Kodak Company e, por conseguinte, à indústria a que esta pertence. Em 1880, com apenas 26 anos, George Eastman iniciou o fabrico de placas secas, um produto inovador, criado pelo próprio após três anos de estudo intensivo sobre fotografia. Apesar de, comparativamente às pesadas máquinas e chapas húmidas que se utilizavam na época, estas placas serem já um produto revolucionário, Eastman ainda não estava satisfeito com o produto final: queria levar a fotografia a todas as pessoas. Continuando a sua pesquisa conseguiu, em 1883, criar um filme fotográfico em rolo, que surpreendeu toda a indústria e, alguns anos mais tarde (1888) lançou a primeira maquina Kodak que funcionava exclusivamente com rolo e tornou a fotografia acessível a todos. A partir de 1892 a empresa passou a ter a......

Words: 1369 - Pages: 6

Kodak Case Analysis

...Kodak’s Challenge | MGMT 520.002 | | Class Period 1:30 | | | Kodak’s Challenge Introduction The Kodak Company was started by George Eastman, an American who found himself very fascinated with still photography and cameras. During the late 1870’s, most of the cameras were bulky, heavy, and weren’t meant for the use of the average person. That’s when Eastman decided to leave the U.S. and head to London to start his company which he hoped would solve this problem and change the photography industry forever. By 1888, Eastman created the first Kodak camera and with that laid the foundation for making photography available to everyone. Industry Analysis The inkjet printer industry shares $45 billion a year of the total overall market. The industry is shared by many different competitors such as: Canon Inc., Fujifilm Holdings Corp., Sony Corp., Konica Minolta Holdings Inc., and Lexmark International Inc. This industry is directly linked to the Computer segment of this industry because the computer hardware is the products that use this ink. The top hardware competitors Kodak will be competing with are: Hewlett-Packard, Epson, Canon, Lexmark, Dell, Brother, and Samsung. Kodak plans to enter this competitive market in these 2 different sectors with their own printers and ink that will cost half the price of the inks in the stores now. Kodak may run into some issues in the future and will cause problems for inkjet-printer makers. With the low price in ink, the other...

Words: 1786 - Pages: 8

Kodak

...The case presents us with the problems that Kodak is facing because they have been complacent in maintaining their market, which paved the way for Fuji to encroach on their territories. Kodak has been on top of the market for so long that they did not expect a relative newcomer in the US market to succeed that much. Fuji has the advantage of capitalizing on the support of the Japanese government, as well as an almost monopoly in Japan, which is why Fuji can afford to lower prices in the United States market. Right now Kodak is faced with two main dilemmas, one its competition with Fuji that will become more pronounced since they both plan to enter the lucrative Chinese market, and the bigger problem that is its struggle to stay relevant despite the advent of the digital cameras. By 1998 Kodak was suffering relatively constant declining sales. The only thing that saved them financially that year so they could post a positive net income was the layoff of more than 16,000 employees. This is referenced in the financials by cutting the SG&A Expense by nearly half as compared to that of a year ago. It is mentioned in the article and unclear if the cut in SG&A also was a result of cutting marketing. If that occurred, then as mentioned in the case, it was a business mistake. The second problem with Kodak's is that it has been the industry leader for so long that it developed a collective mindset of invincibility. They did not keep strong tabs of their competitors and if they do......

Words: 1876 - Pages: 8

Gdr and Kodak Case

...Introduction: GDR or Georginelli Dental Research shifted from an active business corporation to one that has become excessively careful, as its elevated margin film transactions have eroded. Even though the phases-and-gates procedure is in place at GDR delivers leadership to projects, the motivation and spirit that directed the corporation to former triumph has been removed from the association. The case brings the story of two characters that are motivated to bring back that "can do" spirit as they try to quickly commercialize the Bart scanner and expand the life of film. Issues in this case involve, entrepreneurial corporations and their business strategies and processes for managing new product development. Another issue is the implications these strategies and procedures have on acknowledging the demands of shareholders, consumers and employees. Also, the part that individuals can play in "pushing through" corporate culture and processes to advance time-to-market. This case’s emphases on the methods people may overcome inner corporation struggles or conflicts by affiliating in this case with an OEM partner that owns complementary competences. When pursuing a strategic associate, most deliberate in terms of technical skills; nevertheless, the culture of a partner is just as vital. QUESTIONS: COMMUNICATION: 1. As a project manager, what should Bella do now that Namath has given the approval to proceed with Bart? Bella should work closely with BT Wang to insure......

Words: 1075 - Pages: 5

Kodak

...KODAK CASE STUDY HOW KODAK LEVERAGED THE POWER OF COMMUNITY published on 5/20/2008 at MarketingProfs.com by Kimberly Smith When it chose to enter the saturated inkjet market 20 years late, Eastman Kodak had a few surprises up its sleeve: half-priced ink cartridges and prints that retain their bright colors more than 600 times longer than competitor brands. Still, in a world where more-tantalizing gadgets such as ultra-thin laptops and digital cameras often take center stage, the company found it also needed a little ingenuity on the marketing side if it was to merit the attention it needed to gain market share. Proven advertising techniques were set in motion and a special promotion with NBC's Celebrity Apprentice was launched; nevertheless, questions remained about how effective those were in luring the target market. So company Research Analyst Aprille Byam quickly set out to get a better feel for market perceptions and behavior, hoping she might also generate excitement around the new technology. Aspiring to bridge the gap between quantitative and qualitative research, she worked with online panel management provider Vision Critical in 2007 to create Print Rave, a fusion of Web-based panel and online community that allowed the company to both directly communicate with users and moderate member-to-member interactions. That combination allowed Eastman Kodak to delve into the hard questions and keep users engaged so that it could gather the insight needed to forge......

Words: 1369 - Pages: 6