Irish American

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Submitted By tdrumm1
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The Fighting Irish: From Beginning to End-Fighting for Fun, Life, With a Big Heart
Tanya Drummond
Maryville University

Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to provide information relating to Irish immigrants and Irish-American culture. Religious beliefs remain of importance to many Irish families, as well as traditional celebrations including St. Patrick’s Day. Linking alcohol and celebrations, Irish people are high risk for alcoholism. Furthermore, studies show that heart disease is the number one cause of death within this group of people, causing further alarm of the rampant use of alcohol. Healthcare providers have a duty to prevent further destruction of this jovial society by intervening when welcomed by family and those afflicted by alcohol.

The Fighting Irish: From Beginning to End-Fighting for Fun, Life, With a Big Heart
Today’s Irish population may not be quite as rowdy as once depicted. However, if provoked in the slightest, most likely the person doing the aggravating will soon find out why Irishmen have rightfully earned the nickname, “The Fighting Irish”. As an Irish descendant with the surname, McCollum, I can honestly attest to this part of the Irish temperament. Furthermore, Irishmen do not exclude their own family from violence either. A holiday with my family wouldn’t be normal without a few fist fights as the celebrations continue into the evening hours. When the fights are over, ill feelings released, and more Guinness is flowing we become a loving bunch again.
A true Irishmen is found in the country of Ireland, but countless Irish immigrants descended upon America as early as the 1600s. With these strange newcomers came different dialect, customs, foods, and a deep devotion to Catholicism. Not until the mid-1800s did the Irish begin to invade America due to the potato blight in their native country. Irish people left…...

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