How Is the Theme of Broken Dreams and Hopelessness Presented in of Mice and Men and Death of a Salesman?

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How is the theme of Broken Dreams And Hopelessness presented In Of Mice And Men and Death Of A Salesman?
By: Sara
The themes of broken dreams and hopelessness are explored in the novel Of Mice and Men published in 1934 by Steinbeck, and also in the play Death of The Salesman written in 1949 by Miller. The desire to achieve the American dream which is to own land and be self-sufficient by being one's own boss is made evident in both texts as the protagonists Willy, George and Lennie aim to elevate their status and be successful. However, they face many obstacles and difficulties along the way. Miller and Steinbeck both criticize the American value of commercialism, as the dream to be successful is just a delusion; if you cannot sell or earn money to provide for your family then you are seen as weak and incapable of success. In both texts men are, therefore, marginalized and don't know where they belong. The tragic endings in both texts show the hopelessness of characters not achieving their goals and desires. The essay will explore how the writers portray the theme of hopelessness and the desire to achieve a dream that is ultimately unachievable.
One of the ways Steinbeck shows how eagerly the protagonists are trying to achieve their dream is when George and Lennie find it difficult to get a job. This is shown when George tells Lennie to stay away from "bad things" like he did in "Weed". Steinbeck also reveals how Lennie acts as a barrier for George, as he prevents him from "living so easy" and that without Lennie "he could get a job and work with no trouble". The word “trouble" reveals how dependent Lennie is on George, preventing him from achieving his dream. In Death of a Salesman Miller uses the values in the American Dream. When the Willy states “someday I’ll have my own business” it suggests that he dreams of being independent and not working for others, as…...

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