Honeywell Case

In: Business and Management

Submitted By sunnote1
Words 417
Pages 2
Is company’s business strategy which uses its resources’ superiority to adjust its industrial orientation. By doing these adjustment, company can gain the new profit growth and get rid of its financial difficulties.
Honeywell is one of the biggest American conglomerate company which is very famous for its aerospace systems, automatic system solutions, turbocharger of automobile, special materials and other variety of commercial and consumer products. * On October 20th2015, Honeywell just purchased the three famous brand from Sigma-Aldrich, a famous American life science company which produce mainly chemical and biochemical products used in scientific research, drug development and diagnosis of disease. These three brands which bought from Sigma-Aldrich are Fluka ( chemicals and reagents used for biochemical and pharmaceutical research). Hydranal( titration reagents used by laboratories to measure moisture content in liquids and solids) and Chromasolv( high-purity solvents for chromatography, a technique used to separate and analyze complex mixtures). These three brand products are all chemical and biomedical reagents and bio-chemical laboratory related. Honeywell company, even it’s a highly product diversification, but the specialized field of this company are still mainly focused on industrialized products and technological solutions. Why Honeywell would have interest in life science area. * Even life science area is a new area to Honeywell, but Honeywell still can manage company’s internal resource to adapt into this new area because Honeywell already has its strong chemical expertise and research experience.(Background info: Honeywell has its own fine chemical company since 1870. But its wide variety of products just narrow down to several areas, like metal industry, personal care, catalysts for polymer synthesis and other industrial related…...

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