Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions

In: Social Issues

Submitted By jbrandl
Words 2323
Pages 10
Judith Brandl, Student ID no. 1044912
International Business, 4th Semester

SUmmer semester 2016, 11.06.2016

Table of Contents


Cultural Dimensions according to Hofstede

1. The psychologist Hofstede
a) Geert Hofstede

b) Gert-Jan Hofstede
2. The cultural dimensions

a) Social Orientation - Individualism-Collectivism-Index (IDV)
b) Power Orientation – Power-Distance-Index (PDI)

c) Uncertainty Orientation – Uncertainty-Avoidance-Index (UAI)
d) Goal Orientation – Masculinity-Femininity-Index (MAS)

e) Time Orientation – Long-Time vs. Short-Time-Orientation-Index
(LTO)

3. Examples – Germany, United States, Venezuela
4. Problems and Discrepancies
5. Conclusion
6. Bibliography

1

Cultural dimensions according to Geert Hofstede
Classifying and comparing cultures is strongly connected with the name Geert
Hofstede. The Dutch social psychologist, as he calls himself, was born in 1928 in

Haarlem(Netherlands) as Gerard Hendrik Hofstede. He went to schools until 1945, that was when he completed the Diploma Gymnasium Beta. From 17 on until he was
25 years old, he studied Mechanical Engineering and ended it in 1953 with a Master’s

Degree. After two years of military service he started working in managerial jobs until

1965. He completed his Ph.D. in Social Sciences in part time studies. Already during that time, from 1965 until 1971 he founded and managed the Personnel Research

Department of IBM. In this time, he developed the theory of the Cultural Dimensions

that are presented in this paper. He worked with 117.000 empleyees of IBM from all over the world. In the following years he has been lecturing in Brussels at EIASM

(European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management), in Fontainebleau at

INSEAD (= Institut Européen d’Administation des Affaires) and at the Maastricht
University, to only name a few…...

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