Hart Kruez

In: Business and Management

Submitted By rozen21
Words 26009
Pages 105
Guidelines for Programme Design, Monitoring and Evaluation
Table of contents KEY TERMS 1. BASIC PRINCIPLES 1.1. Development cooperation as part of foreign policy • • • • • 1.1.1 Increasing coordination and coherence 1.1.2 Strategic planning sets the framework 1.1.3 Cooperation has various forms 1.1.4 Policies require action 1.1.5 Finland as a partner

1.2. Towards a common language • • • 1.2.1 An integrated approach improves learning 1.2.2 Project cycle - the life of a development intervention 1.2.3 Level of participation varies

1. 3. Achieving sustainable development • • • • • • • • 1.3.1 Policies must match 1.3.2 Better value for money 1.3.3 Institutional capacity makes a difference 1.3.4 People-centered development emphasises socio-cultural aspects 1.3.5 Participation enhances ownership 1.3.6 Gender equality and participatory development 1.3.7 Environment - not only ecology 1.3.8 Technology must meet the needs

2. PROJECT DESIGN 2. Situation analysis - the cornerstone of project planning • • • • 2.1.1 Background studies and the analysis of stakeholders 2.1.2 Problem analysis - key to the project’s framework 2.1.3 Objectives reflect an ideal future 2.1.4 Strategic choices begin by fixing the project purpose

2.2. Planning with logic • • • • • • • • 2.2.1 Logical framework is a practical tool 2.2.2 Intervention logic states the strategy 2.2.3 Assumptions must hold 2.2.4 Indicators make the plan concrete 2.2.5 Approach describes how 2.2.6 Organisation determines roles and responsibilities 2.2.7 Budget details financial framework 2.2.8 Various roles of the project document

3. MONITORING • 3.1. How stakeholders monitor

• • • • • •

3.2. Integrated approach facilitates monitoring 3.3. What is monitored and how 3.3.1 Progress reports 3.3.2 Annual Monitoring Reports 3.3.3 Other performance monitoring 3.3.4 Financial reports

4. EVALUATION 4.1. What…...

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