For Either an Urban or Rural Area, Describe the Results of Your Fieldwork and Research to Investigate the Success of Rebranding Schemes (15 Marks)

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Submitted By DanielleQ
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During January 2014, I visited Plymouth in order to investigate the success of rebranding schemes implemented to increase the sustainability and economic success within the area. In this essay I will discuss the results collected on the fieldtrip and describe how they are able to show that the rebranding process has been successful.
In order to find out whether the number of people visiting the city centre of Plymouth has increased, I carried out the quantitative method of pedestrian counts at 2 different points – Drake Circus and Frankfort Gate. At 5 minute intervals, I counted the number of people who walked past. At around 12pm, between 150-165 pedestrians walked past. In comparison, at Frankfort Gate in the same amount of time between 50-60 people walked past our eye line. In my opinion, this shows success because the visitors are more attracted to the shopping centre of Drake Circus where there are a range of high street brands where as Frankfort Gate is home to more independent cafes and the local market. Due to the increase in popularity of Plymouth city centre, I carried out a perception analysis. This where I asked the local residents about the different ways Plymouth has rebranded. The most popular result was the development of Drake Circus and when asked about the different places/events they had visited, 2 out of the 3 people interviewed, Drake Circus was the most visited location. However, due to time constraints, I could only carry out the pedestrian counts and interviews at one time and in one location meaning that results may not be a full representation. Therefore, if I were to do this again, I would carry out the process at 3 different times of the day so that a variety of people where seen/spoken to. In order to discuss success in detail, I carried out some secondary research and discovered that in the year 2008-2009 there were 19 million visitors…...

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