Experiment on Food Test

In: Science

Submitted By AnamMaqbool
Words 355
Pages 2
Experiment On Food TestIn: Science
Experiment On Food Test
In this experiment I had to do a food test on a variety of foods such as Apple, Celery, Bread, Biscuit, Cheese, and Milk mixing or combining with the Iodine solution, Sodium Hydroxide solution and Copper Sulphate solution. From that It allowed me to see if there are any changes to the foods when adding the solutions. The most important part when doing this food test was I had to investigate it safely and efficiently followed by the health and safety rules so that I carry out my experiment in a correct way and therefore my results can be accurate enough.

I had to follow the health and safety rules as it was very important for me to follow them when doing the food test experiment. This is because I had to use some chemicals and solutions which sometimes can be allergic or harmful for some people. So in order not to over come any mistakes I had to wear protective glasses and lab coat. They were very important because one for the lab coat it protected if anything spill on the clothes then it will spell in the lab coat for the second one which is protective glasses it will prevent any spill to the eye as glasses are wore.

Equipment needed

Lab coat

Protective glasses

Lamp

Test tube rack

White tile

Filter paper

Method

1.Put a small amount of each of the food substances into a test tube, add a few drops of iodine solution and then record any changes. A blue/black colour indicates the presence of starch.

2. Put a small amount of each of each food substances into a test tube and add

approximately 2cm of sodium hydroxide solution. Then gently shake the test tube and

add two drops of copper sulphate solution. Record any changes. A purple colour or

mauve indicates the presence of protein.

3. Place a small amount of each of the food substances on a piece of…...

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