Free Essay

Director

In: Business and Management

Submitted By sitasepe
Words 10307
Pages 42
al

l Nutrition P h oo ro Sc

Na tio n

g

e mm ra

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:05 PM

Page A

National School
Nutrition Programme
Annual Report
2009/10

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:05 PM

Page B

Department of Basic Education
Private Bag X895
PRETORIA
0001
South Africa
222 Struben Street
PRETORIA
0001
Tel: +27 12 357 3419
Fax: +27 12 324 0260 www.education.gov.za © 2009 Department of Basic Education
Design and layout: Formeset Digital Tshwane, Tel.: (012) 324 0607

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:06 PM

Page i

Acknowledgement
This Annual Report has been made possible by a dedicated team of national and provincial officials who provided the reports reflecting the performance of the
National School Nutrition Programme. Their contributions cannot go unnoticed.
Thanks also go to the project team, Ms N. Mashigo and

Mr S. Mzimba, whose dedication and tireless efforts ensured the delivery of a report of a high standard.
Lastly, special thanks go to the Director for the NSNP,
Ms N. Rakwena and the Chief Director for Health in
Education, Dr F. Kumalo, in providing valuable guidance and support and in editing the various drafts of the report.

National School Nutrition Programme

i

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

Annual Report 2009/10

8/20/2010

3:06 PM

Page ii

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:06 PM

Page iii

Message from the Deputy Director-General
As South Africa hosts the world’s biggest sporting event, the FIFA World Cup 2010™, the Department of Basic
Education (DBE) is proud to announce that 2009 has been a successful year for the National School Nutrition
Programme (NSNP). The highlight of the year has been the extension of the programme for the first time to secondary schools where it has been roundly well received by learners, educators, parents and the wider community. A major milestone!
The profile of the National School Nutrition Programme has been raised substantially. The NSNP is one of the most important components of the Government’s
Programme of Action, specifically assigned the responsibility of addressing children’s ability to learn by providing them with nutritious meals. This is closely aligned with the Department’s over-arching goal of improving the quality of learning and learner achievement (Department of Basic Education, Strategic
Plan 2010 – 2013).
In the year under review, the programme has recorded significant achievements. Amongst others, the programme reached a total of 7 125 273 learners in 20 345 schools nationally providing learners with cooked meals five (5) days a week; the extension of the programme to quintile (Q)1 secondary schools was successful; there was a general improvement in the quality of meals (i.e. all provincial menus now include vegetables and fruit); and the transfer of R83 147 million to provincial departments to procure equipment in preparation of

extending the programme to Q2 secondary schools in
April 2010.
Many schools in all provinces make every effort to implement the programme effectively and with excellence, sometimes within limited resources. In recognition of excellence, innovation and dedication in implementing the programme, the Department held the inaugural NSNP Best Schools Awards. Mogobeng
Primary School from Gauteng Province emerged the winner, receiving their Award and prizes from the Minister of Basic Education, Mrs Angie Motshega in April 2010.
For the 2010/11 financial year, the programme will strengthen monitoring, research, programme advocacy and partnerships to ensure quality meals. We will also prepare for the expansion of the programme to Q3 secondary schools in 2011.
While recognising the achievements of the programme thus far, more work still needs to be done. The DBE recognises and acknowledges the contribution of all officials, communities and partners that have worked tirelessly towards the success of the NSNP. 2010 promises to be yet another exciting year for the programme. Ms G T Ndebele
Deputy Director-General: Social Responsibility and Auxiliary Services
June 2010
National School Nutrition Programme

iii

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

Annual Report 2009/10

8/20/2010

3:07 PM

Page iv

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:07 PM

Page v

Executive Summary
During the 2009/10 financial year, the National School
Nutrition Programme (NSNP) made a valuable contribution to the Departmental goals of learner performance and access to education, through providing a daily nutritious meal to 7 125 273 learners. For the first time the programme was successfully extended to quintile (Q)1 secondary schools in April 2009. The programme will then be phased-in to include Q2 and 3 secondary schools in 2010 and 2011 respectively.

schools to also excel, the DBE has published a booklet titled “The Best of the NSNP”.

Improvement in the quality of meals has been a major priority for the Department with twenty four (24) workshops conducted on menu planning, meal preparation, food safety and hygiene targeting provincial coordinators, Volunteer Food Handlers (VFHs) and
NSNP monitors in six (6) provinces (Free State,
KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo, Mpumalanga, Northern Cape and North-West).

In preparation for the extension to Q2 secondary schools in April 2010, R83, 147 million was transferred to provinces to procure cooking and eating utensils. This has provided equipment such as gas stoves, cups, plates, cooking and eating utensils which made a major difference in serving learners with dignity.

In recognition of best practice, the National Department of Basic Education (DBE) held the first NSNP Best
Schools Awards. Three finalist schools were identified per province. Following an adjudication process,
Mogobeng Primary (Gauteng) emerged the overall winner with Moholeng Primary (Northern Cape) and
Maxonia Primary (Western Cape) in second and third place respectively. The Minister of Basic Education, Ms
Angie Motshekga, presented the top three schools with certificates and prizes in April 2010. To further showcase best practice at school level and to motivate other

In October 2009, National Nutrition Week was successfully commemorated in two schools in Limpopo,
(Maokeng and Ulando Primary Schools), under the theme “Health and Nutrition” and the slogan “Colour is
Cool” encouraging learners to eat a variety of naturally colourful food daily.

Strong partnerships are critical for the programme. In this vein, Massmart Holdings Limited, Hullets, CTP Printers,
Shop Talk, HKLM Group and Mykel Nicolaus
Photography sponsored the development, printing and delivery of a NSNP recipe book entitled ‘Mnandi 4 Sure’.
These have been distributed to schools, through districts, for further improvement in the variety and palatability of meals. The NSNP has provided opportunities for work for
37 844 VFHs who prepare and serve meals. Eleven (11) officials were appointed on contract posts at the national office to increase the human resource capacity to deliver
National School Nutrition Programme

v

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:07 PM

Page vi

on the added responsibility of expanding the programme to more secondary schools in the new financial year and to strengthen monitoring and support.

During the 2010/11 financial year, the Department will continue to prioritise the provision of quality meals through strengthened monitoring, research, partnerships and advocacy.

Catering equipment bought for all schools nominated in the NSNP Best Schools Awards

vi

Annual Report 2009/10

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:07 PM

Page vii

Acronyms
ARC
APO
CEM
DBE
DoA
DoH
DORA
EC
EMGD
FAO
FS
GP
IDSO

Agricultural Research Council
Area Project Office
Council of Education Ministers
Department of Basic Education
Department of Agriculture
Department of Health
Division of Revenue Act
Eastern Cape Province
Education Management and Governance
Development
Food and Agriculture Organisation of the
United Nations
Free State Province
Gauteng Province
Institutional Development Support Officer

KZN
LP
LWC
MP
MRC
NC
NE
NSNP
NW
PED
SMME
VFH
VUT
WC

KwaZulu Natal Province
Limpopo Province
Local Women Cooperative
Mpumalanga Province
Medical Research Council
Northern Cape Province
Nutrition Education
National School Nutrition Programme
North West Province
Provincial Education Department
Small, Medium and Micro Enterprises
Volunteer Food Handler
Vaal University of Technology
Western Cape Province

National School Nutrition Programme

vii

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/23/2010

4:02 PM

Page viii

Definition of Terms
Volunteer Food Handler

Quintile

A parent/community member (usually female) who volunteers to offer services in the preparation, cooking and serving of meals to learners, in return of a monthly stipend. A system of ranking and funding schools taking into account the socio-economic circumstances of learners
(inequality and poverty). For example, the poorest quintiles (1 and 2) receive more funding in terms of the
Norms and Standards for Funding Schools.

Learners play physical games during National Nutrition Week
(Maokeng Primary School, Limpopo)

viii

Annual Report 2009/10

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:08 PM

Page ix

Table of Contents
Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................... 1
Performance by National Office .................................................................................................................. 5
National Overview ................................................................................................................................... 5
Human Resource Capacity at DBE ......................................................................................................... 8
Key Achievements ................................................................................................................................... 8
Conclusion............................................................................................................................................... 11
Plans for the 2010/11 Financial Year ....................................................................................................... 12

Provincial Narrative Reports ........................................................................................................................ 13
Eastern Cape .......................................................................................................................................... 15
Free State................................................................................................................................................ 19
Gauteng................................................................................................................................................... 23
KwaZulu-Natal ......................................................................................................................................... 27
Limpopo................................................................................................................................................... 31
Mpumalanga............................................................................................................................................ 35
Northern Cape ......................................................................................................................................... 39
North West............................................................................................................................................... 41
Western Cape.......................................................................................................................................... 43

Appendix A: NSNP Partnerships ................................................................................................................ 45

National School Nutrition Programme

ix

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

x

Annual Report 2009/10

8/20/2010

3:09 PM

Page x

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:09 PM

Page 1

Introduction
This report reflects the general performance of the
National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP) for the
2009/10 financial year. It is intended for the senior management in the department, NSNP managers, school communities, other government departments, academic institutions, as well as the private sector and civil society partners. Part A of the report presents a national overview of programme performance, with highlights on key achievements, the plans for the next financial year as well as key partnerships that supported the programme. Part B provides a synopsis of performance per province.

Background
The NSNP was conceptualised primarily as an educational intervention aimed at enhancing the educational experience of the most needy primary school learners through promoting punctual school attendance, alleviating short term hunger, improving concentration and contributing to general health development. Since its inception, the NSNP catered only for learners in public primary schools. However, following the 2006 survey by the Fiscal and Finance Committee, it was confirmed that there was a need to expand the programme to secondary schools. In October 2008,
National Treasury increased the NSNP budget to progressively extend the programme to these schools.

The programme was first implemented in quintile (Q)1 secondary schools in April 2009, and will be phased-in to
Q2 and 3 public secondary schools in April 2010 and
2011 respectively.
The key objectives of the NSNP are:





To contribute to enhanced learning capacity through school meals
To strengthen nutrition education in schools; and
To promote sustainable food production initiatives in schools.

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) coordinates and oversees the programme, ensuring adherence to policies and other relevant legislation through monitoring.
Procurement of goods and services for the NSNP is the mandate of the Provincial Education Departments
(PEDs).
The NSNP is funded through a conditional grant that is transferred to provinces according to the Division of
Revenue Act (DORA) as well as other directives from the
DBE and National Treasury (Grant Framework 2009/10).
The allocation to provinces is poverty based in accordance with the national poverty distribution table used in the National Norms and Standards for School
Funding as gazetted by the Minister of Education on
17 October 2008 (Grant Framework 2009/10).
National School Nutrition Programme

1

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/23/2010

4:03 PM

Page 2

The Grant Framework stipulates certain conditions to which provincial departments must adhere to, viz:




All learners in the targeted schools, Q 1 – 3 primary and Q1 secondary schools should be fed by 10h00 on all school days.
An average meal cost per learner per day at:
R 1, 80 for primary schools
R 2, 35 for secondary schools

Failure of PEDs to meet the requirements of the
Conditional Grant may lead to Department of Basic
Education taking steps (e.g. withhold transfer of allocation). Meals provided follow the Food Based Dietary
Guidelines, which provide for a variety of food items inclusive of vegetables and fruit.

DVD shoot for NSNP Best School Awards
(Ebomvini Primary School, KwaZulu-Natal)

2

Annual Report 2009/10

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:11 PM

Page 3

Part
A

National
Performance
Overview

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

Annual Report 2009/10

8/20/2010

3:11 PM

Page 4

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:12 PM

Page 5

National Performance Overview
National Overview
The National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP) directorate, at the Department of Basic Education (DBE), is responsible for co-ordinating the programme. The directorate plays a key role in providing strategic direction, leadership and support as well as programme monitoring and evaluation to ensure that implementation is in line with the DBE strategic goals and complies with the NSNP Grant Framework.
As depicted in Table 1 below, the overall performance of the programme nationally was exceptionally good, as it provided meals to an additional 943 699 quintile (Q)1 secondary school learners for the first time, thus increasing the total number of learners reached to 7 125
273. Learners were provided with meals for an average of 191 days, a significant increase from the 187 days in the 2008/09 financial year.

The programme improved significantly in providing learners with cooked meals, i.e. five (5) cooked meals per week as compared to the previous year where only three (3) provinces provided cooked meals on all five (5) days of the week. Only three (3) provinces out of nine (9) still reported to serving uncooked meals at least once a week. This improvement was made possible by the increase in the average cost per meal per primary school learner was from R 1, 40 (2008/09) to R 1, 85 (2009/10).
The number of Volunteer Food Handlers (VFHs) also increased from 32 904 to 39 716 when compared to the previous financial year. Five (5) provinces (Eastern
Cape, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo, Mpumalanga and
Western Cape) increased the honorarium provided to the
VFHs per month, thus increasing the national average honorarium per month from R420 in 2008/09 to R522 during the reporting period.

National School Nutrition Programme

5

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:12 PM

Page 6

Table 1: Annual Performance Indicators per Province
Performance
Indicators
Number of feeding days EC

FS

GP

KZN

LP

MP

NC

NW

WC

Total

188

189

198

195

194

196

180

196

187

*191

5 308

1 181

1 507

3 777

2 607

1 484

552

1 093

875

18 384

183

90

42

487

574

105

226

132

122

1 961

1 181 584

372 501

545 547

1 590 587

1 020 569

573 674

162 438

429 472

305 202

6 181 574

174 105

66 436

62 642

201 193

208 827

67 349

78 655

55 407

29 085

943 699

Number of cooked meals served per week 4

5

5

5

5

5

4

5

4

*5

Number of uncooked meals served per week

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

*0

Number of service providers contracted

128

12

119

1 481

231

67

317

2

5

2 362

Number of local
Community based cooperatives contracted

0

0

79

108

16

0

0

0

0

203

Number of
Community based
SMMEs
contracted

128

12

40

1 373

215

67

274

0

3

2 112

Number of primary schools
Number of secondary schools
Number of primary school learners Number of secondary school learners (* average)

6

Annual Report 2009/10

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:12 PM

Page 7

Table 1: Annual Performance Indicators per Province (continued)
Performance
Indicators
Large suppliers

EC

FS

GP

KZN

LP

MP

NC

NW

WC

Total

0

0

0

0

0

0

43

2

2

47

Number of fulltime officials employed for the programme

43

21

12

98

140

31

22

52

20

439

Number of NSNP allocated vacancies funded

43

0

3

13

165

44

29

0

20

317

Number of contracted posts

46

0

0

24

0

0

0

29

9

108

Number of food handlers (receiving an honorarium) 9 500

2 816

3 041

5 891

8 115

3 526

1 483

3 076

2 268

39 716

Honorarium per month R 500

R 500

R 600

R 500

R 500

R 500

R 600

R 500

R 500

*R 522

Number of vegetable gardens

1 211

513

210

437

1 479

949

341

424

304

5 868

Meal cost per learner – primary schools R 1.85

R 2.35

R 2.35

R 1.80

R 1.80

R 1.67

R 1.25

R 1.80

R 1.80

*R 1.85

Meal cost per learner – secondary schools

R 2.35

R 2.35

R 2.35

R 2.00

R 2.35

R 2.00

R 1.65

R 2.35

R 2.35

*R 2.19

(* average)

National School Nutrition Programme

7

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:12 PM

Page 8

Human Resource Capacity at DBE
At national level, a team of nine (9) officials was responsible for the management of the programme. Key responsibilities included coordination, monitoring and support to provinces in implementation of the programme. The National School Nutrition Programme
(NSNP) Directorate has increased its human resource capacity from nine (9) to twenty-one (21). Eleven (11) officials have been appointed on one-year contract positions to provide support towards the added responsibility of expanding the programme to secondary schools, as well as to strengthen monitoring.
Provincial Human Resource Capacity is discussed in
Part B of this report.

Key Achievements
1.

School Feeding

Providing nutritious meals to learners is a key output of the programme. Catering only for primary school learners, and excluding learners in combined and secondary schools, was viewed as inequitable by the
Parliamentary Committee on conditional grants. The
Fiscal Financial Committee (FFC) was requested to investigate the feasibility of extending the programme to cater for secondary schools. The 2006 survey by the
FFC, confirmed the need to expand the programme to secondary schools. In October 2008, National Treasury increased the NSNP budget to progressively extend the

8

Annual Report 2009/10

programme to learners in quintile (Q)1 to 3 secondary schools. The programme was successfully extended to
Q1 secondary schools for the first time in April 2009 and will be phased-in to Q2 and 3 secondary schools in the
2010/11 and 2011/12 financial years respectively.
The NSNP succeeded in its mandate by providing nutritious meals to 6 181 574 learners in 18 384 Q1 to 3 public primary schools and 943 699 learners in 1 961 Q1 public secondary schools, i.e. reaching a total of 7 125
273 learners in 20 345 schools nationally.
2.

Monitoring

In implementing its mandate to monitor the programme in line with the Conditional Grant Framework, the
Department visited all provinces to monitor, support and assess progress in programme expansion to Q1 secondary schools, as well as for the development of provincial business plans. Visits to provinces experiencing challenges were prioritised. Furthermore, quarterly reports as well as quarterly inter-provincial meetings were instrumental in ensuring provincial programme implementation and tracking provincial financial performance.
3.

Preparations for expansion to quintile (Q)2
Secondary Schools

In preparation for extension of the programme to Q2 secondary schools in April 2010, R 83 147 million was transferred to provinces to ensure that schools are

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/23/2010

4:05 PM

Page 9

adequately equipped to provide meals to learners.
Provinces were assisted to develop and implement readiness plans to ensure implementation from day one.

4.

Building Capacity at Provincial Level

Improvement in quality meals has been a major priority for the National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP) for the year under review. Twenty four (24) workshops were conducted on menu planning, meal preparation, food safety and hygiene targeting provincial coordinators,
Volunteer Food Handlers and NSNP monitors in six (6) provinces (Free State, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo,
Mpumalanga, Northern Cape and North West).

5.

NSNP Publications

A recipe book entitled ‘Mnandi 4 Sure’ was developed, printed and distributed to schools for further improvement of meals. The recipe book has quantity conversion for large scale food preparation and will assist in the serving of varied and tasty meals.
“The Best of National School Nutrition Programme” was developed to show-case best practice in implementing the programme at the school level. Stories from all provinces are captured to demonstrate what is possible with innovation and hard work. Both publications are on the Education website www.education.gov.za.

Mnandi 4 sure NSNP recipe book

The Best of the NSNP
Programme book

National School Nutrition Programme

9

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

6.

8/20/2010

3:14 PM

Page 10

NSNP Awards

In recognition of best practice in the implementation of the programme in schools, a total of twenty seven (27) schools were nominated from all nine (9) provinces (i.e.
3 per province) for the NSNP Best Schools Awards. The top three (3) best schools were awarded with certificates and cash prizes by the Minister of Basic Education,

Ms Angie Motshekga at the Council of Education
Ministers meeting in April 2010. The first prize went to
Mogobeng Primary School (Gauteng), second was
Moholeng Primary School (Northern Cape) and the third prize went to Maxonia Primary School (Western Cape).
All twenty seven (27) finalists received certificates and catering equipment.

Mogobeng Primary School (GP)

Ms Angie Motshekga – Minister of Basic Education with
(from left to right): Ms Philicity Marede, Ms Alphine Zwane,
Ms Letta Molapo all from Mogobeng Primary, and
Ms Barbara Creecy, MEC for Education in Gauteng
Province

10

Moholeng Primary School (NC)

From left to right: Mr Stanley Molale, Ms Fidzani, Ms Gugu
Ndebele – Deputy Director General: Social Responsibility and Auxiliary Services (DBE), Ms Sylvia and Rev Themba
Andrease – Principal (second row from right)

Annual Report 2009/10

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:14 PM

Page 11

Maxonia Primary School (WC)

Ms Angie Motshekga – Minister of Basic Education with
(from left to right): Ms Joan Jacobs, Mr Fraser Baard –
Principal, Mr Donald Grant (Western Cape MEC), Ms
Thokozile Magudulela – NSNP (DBE), Ms Caetitia Albertus and Ms Sheila Zimerie

7.

Partnerships

The Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United
Nations (FAO) funded a baseline study on school communities’ knowledge, attitudes and perceptions on food gardens and nutrition education. The study was conducted in all nine (9) provinces. FAO also funded the development of manuals for Sustainable Food
Production in Schools (SFPS) and Nutrition Education
(NE).
Massmart Holdings limited, Hullets, CTP Printers, Shop
Talk, HKLM Group and Mykel Nicolaus Photography in collaboration with the Department, developed and

printed a recipe book titled ‘Mnandi 4 sure’. It was distributed to schools. The recipe book will assist
Volunteer Food Handlers to prepare a variety of meals that are palatable and nutritious.

Conclusion
The year 2009/10 was a very exciting year, where for the first time the programme was extended to quintile 1 secondary schools. The programme recognizes and acknowledges the contribution of all officials, communities and partners that have worked tirelessly towards the success of the National School Nutrition
National School Nutrition Programme

11

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:14 PM

Page 12

Programme and will continue to prioritise the provision of quality meals through monitoring, research, partnership and advocacy.




Plans for the 2010/11 Financial Year

In line with the programme focus areas, plans for the
2010/11 financial year include the following:

Monitor all three pillars of the programme with a focus of ensuring quality meals

Provide guidelines on food safety and hygiene

Conduct a Baseline Study on the nutritional status and educational performance of Q3 secondary

12

Annual Report 2009/10





school learners
Finalise the Nutrition Education Strategy and strengthen its implementation
Compile and disseminate the 2009/10 annual report Recognize schools with Best Practice in NSNP implementation Strengthen partnerships and community participation in the programme
Support provinces to expand to Q3 secondary schools in April 2011
Develop and disseminate a regular NSNP newsletter NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:16 PM

Page 13

Part
B

Provincial
Narrative
Reports

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

Annual Report 2009/10

8/20/2010

3:17 PM

Page 14

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:17 PM

Page 15

Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium (Port Elizabeth)
The stadium has a capacity of 48 000 and hosted eight (8) 2010 FIFA World Cup games. These included a match for 3rd place and quarter finals

Eastern Cape
Introduction
In the year under review, the Provincial Education
Department (PED) managed to reach a total of 1 181
584 learners in 5 308 quintile 1 – 3 primary schools and
174 105 learners in quintile 1 secondary schools, bringing the total number of learners that benefited from the programme to 1 355 689.
Food is delivered to schools by service providers through a tender procurement system. Schools are responsible for the appointment and payment of Volunteer Food
Handlers (VFHs), who assist in preparing, cooking and serving meals in schools.

Human Resource Capacity
At the provincial level, a total of twenty three (23) Officials and five (5) contracted workers are employed to manage the programme. Thirty five (35) contracted officials are employed at the district level and are responsible for monitoring schools in the twenty three (23) districts.

and district level. The key focus areas included project management, meal planning and nutrition education.
This has contributed towards improved meal preparation and management of the programme.

Menu
Since the inception of the programme, the PED has been serving a bread menu. However, in the year under review, the province started gradually moving towards compliance in serving cooked meals at least four days per week. The exception is a few farm schools which have no cooking areas or space.

Achievements
The PED provides an almost universal cooked menu.
Twenty (20) schools in the Libode district were provided with garden tools worth R60 000. Each school received tools to the value of R3 000.

Training and Development

School principals and educators were trained on permaculture in various districts including Fort Beaufort
(145 schools) and Cofimvaba (200 schools).

The PED conducted training workshops for National
School Nutrition Programme (NSNP) staff, at provincial

Some schools in the East London district have become centers of community development through food

National School Nutrition Programme

15

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:17 PM

Page 16

production initiatives. The district has also adopted one of the quintile 3 secondary school as part of the Whole
School Evaluation Programme. The NSNP has started a vegetable garden in the school. This initiative involves the community which has since started a soup kitchen to feed learners in the school.

Special Events
The NSNP, in partnership with the Department of Health
(DoH), commemorated the National Nutrition Week in
October at the Emafanini Primary School in the Port
Elizabeth district. Ten (10) schools were involved in the campaign wherein learners were taught about healthy eating habits. A demonstration on how to prepare a healthy meal was presented and learners were also encouraged to engage in physical activities. Road shows to promote healthy lunchboxes were held on the
25th March 2010 in conjunction with the Cancer
Association of South Africa in which five (5) schools were invited. Key objective of the launch was to encourage

16

Annual Report 2009/10

learners to eat at least five (5) food types (starch, protein, vitamins, fruit and vegetables) daily. Learners were taught the importance of exercising by Kinders Kinetieke
(Children’s Kinetics).
A Food Fortification Day was held in Port Elizabeth organised by the DoH and the NSNP on the 21st
October 2009 with participation by six (6) schools.
A school garden competition was held in the King
Williamstown and Uitenhage districts in partnership with the Department of Agriculture (DoA). The winners were
Mdolomba Primary, Masele Primary and Fezeka Primary in first, second and third place respectively.

Conclusion
The PED has made strides towards implementing the programme as per requirements despite some challenges through the year.

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:17 PM

Page 17

School coordinator harvesting beetroot
(Londolozani Junior Primary, Eastern Cape)

National School Nutrition Programme

17

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

Annual Report 2009/10

8/20/2010

3:18 PM

Page 18

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:18 PM

Page 19

Free State Stadium (Bloemfontein)
The stadiumhas a capacity of 45 000 and hosted six (6) 2010 FIFA World Cup games

Free State
Introduction

Training and Development

The Provincial Education Department (PED) reached
372 501 learners in 1 181 quintile 1 – 3 primary schools and 66 436 learners in 90 quintile 1 secondary schools. In total, the programme reached 438 937 learners in the year under review with an increase of 25
391 learners compared to the previous financial year (413 546). Although the provincial department experienced challenges in extending the programme to quintile 1 secondary schools in April 2009 and in feeding on time, this was later implemented with success. The PED facilitated capacity building workshops and training for NSNP officials, educators and Volunteer
Food Handlers (VFHs). The key areas covered were
Project Management, vegetable production, food preparation and food safety.

Funds are transferred directly to schools to procure food, except in farm schools, where a quotation system is used. Menu
Despite the budgetary challenges, the PED complied with menu options and provided five (5) cooked meals a week. During monitoring, it was observed that the service providers procured food in compliance with the menu specifications.

Achievements
Human Resource Capacity
The provincial office has eight (8) permanent posts and forty (40) district officials. The latter are not dedicated to National School Nutrition Programme
(NSNP), but are responsible for all learner support programmes. Districts have a key responsibility to monitor the programme, support schools and verify claims from service providers.

Five (5) road shows were conducted in all five (5) districts to prepare for the expansion of the programme to quintile 2 secondary schools.
Twenty three (23) schools i.e. five (5) in Lejweleputswa, five (5) in Fezile Dabi, eight (8) in Motheo and five (5) in
Thabo Mofutsanyane districts, were provided with vegetable tunnels by the Department of Agriculture
(DoA). Furthermore, the programme received support

National School Nutrition Programme

19

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:18 PM

Page 20

from external donors and service providers. Twenty (20) schools in Motheo district were provided with steel cabinets designed for the storage of food.

Mofutsanyane were nominated for the NSNP Best
Schools Awards.

Conclusion
Special Events
Three (3) primary schools viz. Theha Setjhaba in Fezile
Dabi, Atang in Motheo and Letlotlo in Thabo

20

Annual Report 2009/10

Although this has been a challenging financial year for the programme, the support received from partners assisted in continuing to provide meals as planned.

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:19 PM

Page 21

Volunteer Food Handlers wearing colourful aprons
(Ditshabatsohle Primary, Free State)

National School Nutrition Programme

21

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

Annual Report 2009/10

8/20/2010

3:19 PM

Page 22

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:19 PM

Page 23

Soccer City (Johannesburg)
The Stadium has a capacity of 94 700 and hosted eight (8) 2010 FIFA World Cup games. These included the opening and final matches

Gauteng
Introduction

Training and Development

The Provincial Education Department (PED) reached
545 547 learners in 1 507 quintile 1-3 primary schools and 62 642 learners in 42 quintile 1 secondary schools. The province continued with its commitment to progressively extend the programme with an increase of 82 386 learners reached; i.e. from
525 803 in 2008/09 to 608 189 for the 2009/2010 financial year.

The PED conducted capacity building workshops on risk management, procurement and supply chain management targeting provincial National School
Nutrition Programme (NSNP) staff.
For VFHs, workshops on food handling and preparation were conducted at schools with Consumer Study Centres in three (3) districts. Afrox conducted workshops on gas safety at targeted schools. Furthermore, workshops on
Sustainable Food Production (SFP) were organised for the IDSOs who are responsible for the NSNP at district level. Food is delivered to schools by service providers through a tender procurement system. Schools are responsible for appointing Volunteer Food Handlers (VFHs) to prepare, cook and serve meals to learners.

Menu
Human Resource Capacity
The PED employs eight (8) permanent officials to manage the programme. There are two (2) vacant posts.
Institutional Development Support Officials (IDSOs) are responsible for monitoring schools. There are no dedicated personnel in the districts employed to monitor schools resulting in inconsistent visits and minimal monitoring. The province contracts sixty (60) interns annually for this purpose. However, when their contracts expired in October 2009, no extension was granted. New appointments will be made in the new financial year.

The Gauteng province complied with menu options and provided five (5) cooked meals per week for all
198 days as planned. Menus included varied starch dishes, proteins and vegetables. Breakfast, which is the most important meal of the day, continue d to be served to all learners in all schools. Gauteng remains the only province providing breakfast.
The national Department of basic Education
(DBE) conducted a survey study on the implementation of the school breakfast in the province to glean lessons for national roll-out

National School Nutrition Programme

23

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:19 PM

Page 24

Achievements
The province has sixteen (16) newly constructed schools that opened in the 2009/2010 financial year. The new schools have well-built brick and mortar kitchens and storage facilities installed as part of improved infrastructure for use by the NSNP.
A total of six (6) mobile kitchens were donated to schools in the Ekurhuleni South and Gauteng West Districts by
Game Stores a division of Massmart Holdings limited.
The provincial department ensured that all quintile 1 secondary schools install steel gas cages with the requisite signage in adherence with specifications and as a safety precaution. Learners are, as a result, out of danger and the gas cylinders at a lesser risk of being removed. Special Events
Three (3) primary schools were nominated for the NSNP
Best Schools Awards and the overall winner was
Mogobeng Primary School from Ekurhuleni South. A certificate and cash prize of R60 000 was presented to

24

Annual Report 2009/10

the School Principal, Ms M Morokoane by the Minister of Basic Education, Ms A Motshekga, at the Council of
Education Ministers’ meeting held in Pretoria on 15 April
2010.
The official launch of the extension of NSNP to quintile 1 secondary schools was held in Vlakfontein Secondary
School, in the Johannesburg South district. The school was also adopted by Clover/Danone, Food Garden
Foundation and the Public Service Association to initiate and sustain the school and community garden.

Conclusion
The province has consistently provided meals to learners especially breakfast, which is the most important meal of the day, reaching the most vulnerable and poor learners. There is still room for improvement to introduce a variety of meals per week to address challenges in menu fatigue. The Department is currently maintaining a consistent annual expenditure pattern that complies with requirements.
Human resource capacity at provincial and district level remains a priority.

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/23/2010

4:06 PM

Page 25

NSNP school committee with Volunteer Food Handlers
(Pula Difate Primary, Gauteng)

National School Nutrition Programme

25

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

Annual Report 2009/10

8/20/2010

3:20 PM

Page 26

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:21 PM

Page 27

Moses Madhida Stadium (Durban)
The Stadium has a capacity of 70 000 and hosted seven (7) 2010 FIFA World Cup games. These included one of the semi-final games

KwaZulu-Natal
Introduction
The total number of learners has increased from
1 541 268 in 2008/09 to 1 791 780 in 2009/10. This includes 1 590 587 learners in 3 777 quintile 1-3 primary schools and 201 193 learners in 487 quintile 1 secondary schools. The programme was successfully extended for the first time to secondary schools. The targeted secondary schools were provided with new catering equipment which includes gas stoves, gas cylinders, catering pots, stainless steel plates and spoons.

activities in schools. A small team of between six (6) and eight (8) officials per district has been assigned to monitor programme implementation at school level and to facilitate the payment of the claims of service providers. Training and Development

The province uses a quotation system in sourcing food items and selected service providers distribute these to schools. The service providers are Small, Medium and
Micro Enterprises (SMMEs) and Local Women
Cooperatives (LWCs). A need has been identified to provide skills training to the LWCs to strengthen their financial management skills.

Workshops on basic nutrition and vegetable production were conducted for field workers in an effort to improve their knowledge and skills towards engaging them as
Nutrition Assistants. Thirty six (36) workshops on food safety, hygiene and food preparation were held for five thousand (5000) Volunteer Food Handlers. In addition, workshops were held with a specific focus on the implementation of National School Nutrition Programme in secondary schools for 1 074 Principals and 358 members of School Governing Bodies.

Human Resource Capacity

Menu

The Provincial Education Department (PED) has maintained a provincial team of nineteen (19) officials responsible for the management and monitoring of school nutrition activities. Their role also includes coordination of food production and nutrition education

In compliance with the NSNP Grant Framework, the PED served five (5) cooked meals per week to learners for
195 school days. Most schools complied with the chosen menu options. However in some areas the availability of fresh vegetables presented a challenge.

National School Nutrition Programme

27

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:21 PM

Page 28

Achievements

Special Events

The PED extended the programme to quintile 1 secondary schools with success.

All districts celebrated National Nutrition Week in
October in partnership with the Provincial Department of
Health. Activities included the planting of trees, spinning of a Nutrition Wheel, Nutrition talks and Health
Screening. Learners were given small gifts in the form of rulers, caps and juice bottles for participating.

The Flemish project has initiated ninety (90) food gardens in schools. This created employment opportunities for ninety (90) men and women as gardeners. In terms of poverty alleviation and job creation, 1 482
SMMEs, including 72 LWCs were contracted to the programme, the latter totalling 412 women. The LWCs were given financial assistance by iThala Bank in order to commence with their businesses.

28

Annual Report 2009/10

Conclusion
This has been the best year of programme implementation in KwaZulu-Natal.

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:21 PM

Page 29

NSNP School committee
(Zubane Junior Primary, KwaZulu-Natal)

National School Nutrition Programme

29

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

Annual Report 2009/10

8/20/2010

3:22 PM

Page 30

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:22 PM

Page 31

Peter Mokaba Stadium (Polokwane)
The stadium has a capacity of 45 000 and hosted four (4) 2010 FIFA World Cup games

Limpopo
Introduction
The Provincial Education Department (PED) provided meals to 1 020 569 learners in 2 607 primary schools and 208 827 learners in 574 quintile 1 secondary schools. The total number of learners has increased with
231 083 learners compared to the previous year.
Food is delivered to schools by service providers through a tender procurement system. Schools are responsible for appointing Volunteer Food Handlers (VFHs) to prepare, cook and serve meals. Payment of VFHs is the responsibility of the schools.

Based Dietary Guidelines, meal planning, basic food preparation and food storage. Furthermore, forty nine
(49) capacity building workshops on Sustainable Food
Production in Schools (SFPS) were held in the province and as a result, seven (7) mode vegetable gardens were developed and used for demonstration during the workshops. Food and Trees for Africa also conducted workshops for educators responsible for gardening, SGB members and school gardeners on vegetable production. Menu

At the provincial level, seven (7) officials managed the programme with twenty five (25) officials at district level for monitoring. There are one hundred and thirty four
(134) clerks based at circuit level to process claims.

The PED complied with the provincially specified menu options and served five (5) cooked meals per week in both primary and secondary schools on all 194 school days. The quality of food items has improved due to an increase in the cost allocation per learner per day.
However, there is still a need to improve on the quality of soya mince.

Training and Development

Achievements

Food safety was identified as a major challenge in the programme. One hundred and three (103) food safety workshops were conducted in all five (5) districts targeting VFHs, educators and School Governing Body
(SGB) members in both primary and secondary schools.
Other key areas addressed were menu options, Food

Despite challenges of maintaining food gardens, it is worth noting that out of one thousand and sixty three (1
063) food gardens initiated, at least one thousand and fifty six (1 056) gardens were sustained through the year.
As a result, sixty (60) schools supply service providers with vegetable produce. The province also has one

Human Resource Capacity

National School Nutrition Programme

31

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:22 PM

Page 32

hundred and two (102) functional orchards and three (3) small stocks. The PED extended the programme to quintile 1 secondary schools with success.

Special Events
National Nutrition Week, organised by the National
Department of Basic Education in collaboration with provincial officials, was celebrated at two(2) schools
(Maokeng and Ulando Primary) in the Warmbad circuit during October 2009. The event focused on promoting healthy lifestyles among learners.

32

Annual Report 2009/10

National World Food Day was commemorated in
October 2009 at Muyexe Village in Mopani district.
Finally, a Sustainable Food Production (SFP) summit was held in March 2010 at Bolivia Lodge, attended by parents from the local area.

Conclusion
Although not all schools in the province have reached the desired standards in NSNP implementation, programme was implemented with success and with overall notable improvement.

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:23 PM

Page 33

An educator dishing up food
(Rampuru Primary School in Limpopo)

National School Nutrition Programme

33

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

Annual Report 2009/10

8/20/2010

3:23 PM

Page 34

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:23 PM

Page 35

Mbombela Stadium (Nelspruit)
Mbombela is a siSwati word meaning “many people in one place”. The Stadium has a capacity of 46 000 and hosted four (4) 2010 FIFA World
Cup games

Mpumalanga
Introduction

management of the programme; food safety measures; and nutrition education. Information sessions were also held for service providers on menu specifications, in preparation for the expansion of the programme to quintile 2 secondary schools in April 2010.

The Provincial Education Department (PED) reached
573 674 learners in 1 484 primary schools and 67 349 learners in 105 quintile 1 secondary schools. The number of learners reached was 68 023 higher than in the previous year. The expansion to secondary school was a success and well received by local communities.

Menu

The food is delivered to schools by service providers through a tender procurement system. Schools are responsible for appointing Volunteer Food Handlers
(VFHs) to prepare, cook and serve meals.

Schools serve meals according to the specified menu options, serving five (5) cooked meals a week on all school days. Educators supervise learners during feeding, and learners eat in the classrooms.

Human Resource Capacity

Achievements

The programme is managed by forty eight (48) officials, six (6) at the provincial level and forty two (42) in districts.
The officials are responsible for monitoring National
School Nutrition Programme (NSNP) activities and processing claims by service providers.

Secondary schools were provided with wendy houses serving as kitchen facilities. All one hundred and five
(105) secondary schools received eating utensils.

Training and Development
The PED conducted capacity building workshops targeting NSNP staff, VFHs and school committees.
These workshops were focusing on collecting and capturing data for VFHs; implementation and

In strengthening services to children and families, the
Rights of Children directorate in the Premier’s office coordinated a service delivery initiative on the 18th August
2009, where all provincial departments, national competencies in the province, municipality and civil society structures extended services to the community of Lomshiyo II, within the Umjindini Municipality. The
NSNP displayed different food items offered in schools.

National School Nutrition Programme

35

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:24 PM

Page 36

A modernised irrigation system funded by Food and
Trees for Africa has been installed by the Department of
Agriculture at Ndimande primary school, Bushbuckridge region. Special Events
In July 2009, the NSNP joined other provincial departments in celebration of the 91st birthday of the former President, Mr. Mandela, at Silindokuhle Special
School. A vegetable garden was established and trees planted. 36

Annual Report 2009/10

Eight (8) schools participated in the Woolworths
Eduplant Gardening Competition.

Conclusion
The province is fed all targeted learners in primary and secondary schools, and was able to honour all activities as per the 2009/10 business plan. Payment of service providers also improved. Parents and learners in secondary schools were very happy about the extension of the programme.

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:24 PM

Page 37

The vegetable garden at Lugedlane Primary School, Mpumalanga

National School Nutrition Programme

37

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

Annual Report 2009/10

8/20/2010

3:24 PM

Page 38

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:25 PM

Page 39

Northern Cape
Introduction

Achievements

The Provincial Education Department (PED) reached
162 438 learners in 552 quintile (Q) 1-3 primary schools providing daily nutritious meals. The province has been feeding secondary schools since the 2007/8 financial year. The province is also providing feeding to additional learners in quintile 4-5 primary and secondary schools.

The programme has a positive impact in schools through providing daily nutritious meals and creating jobs by supporting local Small, Medium and Micro Enterprises
(SMMEs).

Funds are transferred directly to schools to procure meals. This has proved to be a successful model for delivery. Human Resource Capacity

The Nutrition Education team has drafted guidelines on tuck shops and school vendors.
Moholeng primary school was judged the third Best
School in the National School Nutrition Programme
(NSNP) Awards. They received a cash prize, certificate as well as catering equipment.

The programme is managed by nine (9) officials at the provincial level and seventeen (17) at the district level.

Special Events
Training and Development
All Volunteer Food Handlers (VFHs) in the province were trained in basic hygiene and the Food Based Dietary
Guidelines.

The NSNP in the Northern Cape, through its Sustainable
Food Production sub-programme, held the annual school garden competition in five (5) districts. Gala events were held in each district and prizes awarded to the winning schools.

Menu
The majority of schools in the province comply with menu options except on rare occasions when stock is not available. This resulted in the province serving four (4) instead of five (5) cooked meals as stipulated.

Conclusion
The province continued to pioneer almost universal implementation in both primary and secondary schools.
National School Nutrition Programme

39

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

Annual Report 2009/10

8/20/2010

3:25 PM

Page 40

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:26 PM

Page 41

Rayal Bafokeng Stadium (Rustenburg
The stadium has a capacity of 44 530 and hosted six (6) 2010 FIFA World Cup games

North West
Introduction

Achievements

The programme reached 429 472 learners in 1 093 quintile 1-3 primary schools and 55 407 learners in 132 quintile 2 secondary schools. The number of learners benefiting from the programme increased by 69 312 compared to the 2008/9 financial year.

The documents stipulating the Terms of Engagement, contracts of the VFHs and the guidelines on implementation of the programme have been approved and distributed to all participating schools.

Human Resource Capacity
The staff comprises of seven (7) officials at provincial level, twelve (12) district officials and thirty six (36) Area
Project Officials (APOs).

Education Management and Governance Development
(EMGD) also played an important role in monitoring
National School Nutrition Programme funds. They have introduced a financial management tool which assists in tracking income and expenditure patterns in schools.

Special Events
Training and Development
Training and capacity building focused on portion sizes, meal planning, menu planning, meal preparation, hygiene and food safety for APOs. Training for Volunteer
Food Handlers (VFHs) focused on the new menu options for expansion to quintile 2 secondary schools. Finally, four (4) capacity building workshops on food production and management of vegetable gardens were conducted.

Menu
Supply of dehydrated vegetables was discontinued and replaced with fresh vegetables. Greater variety in menu options allows for regional preferences in the province.
The PED provided five (5) cooked meals per week in all
196 school days.

Three (3) primary schools in the programme, viz. GaIsrael, Mogosane and Marang, were profiled in the “ The
Best of the National School Nutrition Programme” booklet published in March 2010 showcasing good practices in school feeding and food gardening.

Conclusion
The programme was implemented successfully and did not experience any interruptions or stoppages of feeding.
The cooperation of all stakeholders at all levels ensured that the programme was sustained and maintained in the year under review. Feeding in quintile 1 secondary schools started well at the beginning of the financial year and has also been sustained.
National School Nutrition Programme

41

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

Annual Report 2009/10

8/20/2010

3:26 PM

Page 42

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:26 PM

Page 43

Green Point Stadium (Cape Town)
The stadium has a capacity of 70 000 and hosted eight (8) 2010 FIFA World Cup games. These included one (1) round of match, one (1) quarter final and one (1) semi-final match

Western Cape
Introduction
305 202 learners in 875 quintile(Q) 1-3 primary schools and 29 085 learners in 122 secondary schools were provided with nutritious meals. The province has been feeding targeted secondary schools since the 2006/7 financial year.
Food is procured using the tender system. Five (5) large companies, three (3) Small, Medium and Micro
Enterprises and one (1) Cooperative supply and distribute food to schools.

Human Resource Capacity
A total of five (5) officials manage the programme at provincial level. In each of the eight (8) districts, two (2) officials are responsible for administration, monitoring and support.

Training and Development
Five (5) capacity building workshops were conducted for the Western Cape National School Nutrition Programme
(NSNP) staff. The topics included nutrition education, monitoring and evaluation, mentoring and support, gas safety, safe handling of equipment and menu implementation. Volunteer Food Handlers in all districts were trained on food and gas safety as well as hygiene.

A total of twenty nine (29) workshops on Sustainable
Food Production in schools (SFPS) were held in all districts, focusing on garden establishment, garden management, soil fertility, permaculture, planting in containers and planting of fruit trees.

Menu
Schools generally adhere to provincial menu options, except for a nominal number of schools where an uncooked menu is served due to a lack of infra-structure or where, for short periods, uncooked menus are served due to equipment being stolen. On average the province provided four (4) cooked meals per week for 187 school days. Achievements
A breakfast programme was piloted at one hundred and five (105) schools in the Metropole district. The breakfast consisted of a maize meal cereal in the morning, prior to the main meal, on two (2) days per week. All costs for this pilot were carried by the Peninsula School Feeding
Association.
One hundred and fifty nine (159) schools received mobile kitchens and sixty one (61) of these were sponsored by the Qids-Up programme.

National School Nutrition Programme

43

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:27 PM

Page 44

Special Events
The Department of Health supported the NSNP on food safety and nutrition. Three (3) Western Cape schools were nominated for the National School Nutrition
Programme Best Schools Awards, Maxonia Primary was placed third, a major achievement.

44

Conclusion
The NSNP in the Western Cape has successfully implemented the programme in the 2009/10 financial year. The programme remains well supported by both the provincial and national offices with good cooperation from schools, service providers, partners and the NSNP staff. The programme aims to sustain and improve on current service delivery.

Annual Report 2009/10

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:28 PM

Page 45

Appendix
A

Partnerships

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:28 PM

Page 46

Appendix A: NSNP Partnerships
Partners

How the NSNP is supported

Eastern Cape
Department of Health

Assisted in campaigns on healthy lifestyles (nutrition) in Port Elizabeth district South African Social Security Agency

Assisted in the Food Fortification day held in Port Elizabeth district

Nelson Mandela Foundation and University of Fort Hare

Facilitate mobilisation of communities to participate in Agri-Parks

QIDS UP

Provided garden tools and water tanks to schools in Lusikisiki and
Libode districts

Nelson Mandela Metro

Provided prizes in the form of garden tools, seeds and fertilizers for food garden competition in Port Elizabeth and Uitenhage districts

Nelson Mandela bay Agri-Forum

Assisted schools with food production technical expertise and tools in
Port Elizabeth district

Department of Agriculture

Provided garden tools in Port Elizabeth district

Doctors in private practice

Provided trophies for the garden competitions held in Port Elizabeth district Department of Health

Assisted districts on monitoring food safety in schools

Cancer Association of South Africa (CANSA)

Involved in the nutrition launch in Port Elizabeth district

Kinders Kinetieke

Assisted in teaching learners on the importance of exercising to maintain a healthy lifestyle in Port Elizabeth district

Free State
Department of Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental
Affairs
Department of Public Works: EPWP- Enterprise Development

Establishment of Local Women Cooperatives

Department of Agriculture

46

Establishment of Local Women Cooperatives

Provision of garden tools, seeds, boreholes and training

Annual Report 2009/10

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:28 PM

Partners

Page 47

How the NSNP is supported

Free State (continued)
Department of Health

Provision of seeds

Central University of Technology

Provision of storage cabinets and training of Educators and Volunteer
Food Handlers

Food and Trees for Africa

Training Educators on organic farming

Liquefied Petroleum Gas Safety Association of Southern Africa

Training schools on gas safety

Gauteng
Game Stores

Provision and distribution of six (6) mobile kitchens in two (2) districts
(Gauteng West & Ekurhuleni South)

Food Bank

Sixty seven (67) quintile 1 primary schools in Johannesburg South district benefit from food supplementation of fresh produce and other available dry groceries

FGF (Danone Clover)

Trained forty (40) schools on garden establishment (rotating crops and after care during school holidays)

Department of Agriculture

Provided starter packs to fifteen (15) schools and seeds in four (4) districts, and also provided training for district officials on food production Edu Plant ( Woolworths Trust)

Developed of food gardens at targeted school in seven (7) districts

KwaZulu-Natal
Department of Health

Health promotion in schools and inspection of kitchens to ensure compliance with the food, disinfectant and cosmetic legislation

Department of Agriculture

Training of groundsmen, support of developed gardens

Food Trees for Africa

Promote competitions in schools on gardening

Flanders

Funding for food security projects implemented in ninety (90) schools in the Ugu, Umgugundlovu and Vryheid districts

Department of Water Affairs and Umngeni Water

Food security in schools

National School Nutrition Programme

47

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:28 PM

Page 48

Partners

How the NSNP is supported

KwaZulu-Natal (continued)
Environment and Language Education Trust

Development of school gardens

Department of Economic Development

Mentorship to Local Women Cooperatives

Limpopo
Department of Agriculture

Technical advice to schools on gardening

Department of Public Works

Provided protective clothing for Volunteer Food Handlers

Food and Trees for Africa

Provided training on permaculture

Department of Health

Conduct monitoring and support visits to schools

Mpumalanga
Department of Agriculture Rural Development and Land Administration
Ngala Bush Camp

Donated a water tank to Mahlekisana Primary in Manyeleti circuit

Woolworths foods

Donated food at Hermansburg Primary

Department of Water and Environmental Affairs

Selected Potsanyana Primary to pilot a Rain Water Harvesting Project in Marapyane circuit

Volvo Car Dealer

Built a kitchen at Tsembaletfu, Nsikazi circuit

Imvelo Garden Project

Hosts competitions and donates prizes to the winning schools

Food Garden Foundation

Hosts competitions and give prizes to winning schools.

Department of Health

Health Promotion Programme

Mondi Forest Limited

Donated and maintained the water tank at Glen Eland School

Albany Bakery

48

Supplied schools with seedlings, fertilizers and insecticides

Supply bread once a week to Emdibini Primary and Trichardfontein
Combined Schools in the Highveld circuit

Annual Report 2009/10

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:28 PM

Partners

Page 49

How the NSNP is supported

Mpumalanga (continued)
Sally Mayhew

Built a kitchen at Majika Primary School

BMW Car Dealership in Nelspruit

Supplied seedlings to four (4) schools in Ehlanzeni Region

Department of Public Works, Road and Transport

Provided training on web-based form on controlling and data capturing for Volunteer Food Handlers

Northern Cape
Department of Agriculture

Assist schools with garden starter packs, seed and soil testing

Department of Water Affairs

Provided boreholes, fruit trees and water testing

Griqualand Wes Korporasie (GWK)

Sponsors the Pixley Ka Seme district school garden competition

Karsten Farms

Sponsors the schools garden competitions in Siyanda district

ABSA

Sponsors the provincial schools garden competition

De Beers Fund

Sponsors both the Frances Baard and Kgalagadi districts school garden competitions

North West
Lonmin Mining Company

Supply five (5) Bapong schools around the mines with fresh vegetables and fruits weekly and also top up the Volunteer Food
Handler stipend in surrounding schools

Pecanwood Educational Trust (PET)

Training Volunteer Food Handlers and monitoring at four (4) schools around their vicinity. Donate R 5 000 per month to buy groceries

SPAR (Brits)

Donates food to two (2) local primary schools

Royal Bafokeng Institute

Provide two (2) meals per day to Bafokeng schools and also top up
Volunteer Food Handlers stipend

Department of Agriculture, Conservation, Environment & Rural
Development-Land Care Programme

Assisted schools in Moses Kotane West district, Potchefstroom and
Klerksdorp APO`s with garden tools, seeds, seedlings and fruit trees to establish vegetable gardens

National School Nutrition Programme

49

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:28 PM

Partners

Page 50

How the NSNP is supported

North West (continued)
Love Life`s Food Garden Programme

Assisted Kgolane Primary School in Dwarsberg Moses (Kotane West district) to establish and sustain a vegetable garden

Western Cape
Earth Child

Imbali Support

Provides gardening supplies and pays for the gardener at P.C.
Peterson Primary School in Kylemore (Stellenbosch)

Department of Agriculture

Officials render assistance and financial support to schools in the
Ladysmith and Calitzdorp towns

Landcare

Conducted camps for learners in the Overberg district

Casidra

Supported some schools with supplies and equipment in the Overberg and Metro East districts. They also demonstrated the growing of crops using boxes in Calitzdorp. Assisted with the re-establishment of the food garden at Noordhoek primary school in Velddrift

School Environmental Education Development [SEED]

Teaches classes on environmental matters and supports existing and the establishing of vegetable gardens

Heart

Supported twelve (12) schools with shade cloth tunnels (Food Tents)

Breede River Municipality

Has a Community Worker who helps farm schools in Robertson,
Bonnievale and Montagu with gardening supplies such as seeds and seedlings Woolworths Trust (Eduplant)

Conduct permaculture workshops annually and hold school garden competitions Department of Health

Official render support to the NSNP management in regard to food safety and nutrition issues

Peninsula School Feeding Association

Provide breakfast to one hundred and five (105) schools and feeding additional learners

Qids-Up programme – Western Cape Education Department

50

Provides two officers on a regular basis to work with learners and eduators at Zerilda Primary School on Health and Environment

Enabled sixty one (61) schools to purchase mobile kitchens

Annual Report 2009/10

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:29 PM

Page 51

Notes
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
National School Nutrition Programme

51

NSNP Inside Text 2010 bk10:Layout 1

8/20/2010

3:29 PM

Page 52

Notes
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................................

52

Annual Report 2009/10…...

Similar Documents

Free Essay

Director

...with their portfolios. Activities 1. The facilitator will start the class with a short review. 2. The student will turn in the assignment, which will be presented and discussed with the rest of the class. The subject will be discussed with questions and answers generated by fellow students. 3. Scenario: The following scenario is presented to initiate a discussion based on the points of view and concepts learned by the students: a. A very successful entrepreneur had created a very difficult situation for his company. He insists in utilizing a process that it is not appropriate or obsolete. If this man is also the founder and biggest stockholder, what would be the biggest concern for the employees, other stockholders, board of directors, managers, and creditors about this entrepreneur? 4. Each group will present in writing the progress and development of the Strategic Plan – diagnostics, scenarios, strategies, objectives and tactics. The facilitator will provide feedback accordingly. 5. The facilitator will divide the class in groups of three to four students. Utilizing the SWOT Worksheet included in this Workshop, the groups will select an organization and complete the same. Information will be based on their perception about the organization selected. Prep. 2006 Sylvia Y. Cosme Montalvo, MBA. Rev. 2008 Amilcar Martinez, MBA. STMG 601 Strategic Management 28 6. After the SWOT Worksheet is completed for the above organization, the groups will......

Words: 10599 - Pages: 43

Premium Essay

Director

...Unit 2 Assignment Job 1 Job Title: School Psychologist and Director of Guidance Job Description:The psychologist will serve as the coordinator of the school's special education services including resource rooms and a self-contained classroom for 2013-2014 school year. In addition, in working with our pre-school program, the psychologist must understand child development and be able to communicate clearly with faculty and families. The successful candidate will be able to read and interpret psychological testing in a manner that is helpful to children, parents and teachers. Also, as the Director of Guidance this individual will work with the Principal and other members of the administration to develop a school-wide, age appropriate guidance program that integrates aspects of Jewish life, Sephardic culture and social/emotional understanding. A PhD in Psychology or a PsyD is required for this position. Skills needed for the job, taken from both the job description and your own analysis of the job (Note: Be sure to list at least 5 skills, three of which are specific skills in the XYZ field): |Skill |Necessity of Skill | |1.Active Listening |To be able to fully understand the issues that the client is dealing with so I have the | | |best ways possible in finding......

Words: 716 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Director

...Talent Working For You” Why Concentrica? Many of the companies we speak to despair at the idea of telemarketing because of bad experiences in the past. Nobody likes poorly qualified sales appointments that turn out to be a complete waste of time and we at Concentrica Associates are no different. We understand the pitfalls and our experienced team therefore only deliver highly effective lead generation, business development and outsourced sales services, across a wide portfolio of IT based solutions. With enviable credentials and a proven history in delivering effective business development services, our key differentiators are manifest in the facts that all projects undertaken have 'hands on' involvement from at least one Concentrica director and that we never use inexperienced graduates. These considerations are vital when articulating the more complex sales proposition and importantly, where a requirement exists to minimize the lead time to effective project initiation. The approach therefore, which our long term clients particularly value is to provide a seamless extension to their sales force. We are a highly professional, niche operation, working with IT solutions companies of all sizes, from the start-up enterprise to some of our strategic business partners which include Microsoft, CA Technologies and BMC. We would very much welcome the opportunity to discuss how Concentrica can shape and implement your business development plans. Please contact us to discuss:......

Words: 262 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Directors

...S 182 and 183, directors’ fiduciary duties to avoid undisclosed conflicts between their personal interests and the interests of their company – improper use of position and improper use of information * S 180(1) owe a duty at common law to exercise reasonable care, skill and diligence – business decisions, gaining knowledge of the business and financial position, making inquiries where necessary and relying on others * S 588G imposes a statutory duty on directors to prevent their company incurring debts when there are reasonable grounds to suspect that it is insolvent * Duties in s 180-184 imposed on directors and officers of a corporation * Employees – s 182 improper use of position and s 183 information * ASIC v Adler: Adler participated in making decisions that affected the whole or a substantial part of the subsidiary’s financial standing because of his role on the holding company’s board and investment committee * Middle managers may have a contractual duty to the company to exercise their powers with a reasonable degree of care and diligence and to act in good faith in the best interests of the company, they cannot be liable for civil penalties or criminal offences contravening ss 180- 181 * good faith and proper purpose Directors have overlapping fiduciary and statutory duties to act in good faith and in the best interests of the company and for proper purpose – s 181(1) Both statutory and case law – requires directors to genuinely......

Words: 885 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Director

...that shareholders elect directors who, in turn, hire management to carry out their directives. Shareholders, therefore, control the corporation through the right to elect the directors. Generally, only shareholders have this right. Directors are elected each year at an annual meeting. Although there are exceptions (discussed next), the general idea is “one share, one vote” (not one shareholder, one vote). Corporate democracy is thus very different from our political democracy. With corporate democracy, the “golden rule” prevails absolutely.3 Directors are elected at an annual shareholders’ meeting by a vote of the holders of a majority of shares who are present and entitled to vote. However, the exact mechanism for electing directors differs across companies. The most important difference is whether shares must be voted cumulatively or voted straight. To illustrate the two different voting procedures, imagine that a corporation has two shareholders: Smith with 20 shares and Jones with 80 shares. Both want to be a director. Jones does not want Smith, however. We assume there are a total of four directors to be elected. The effect of cumulative voting is to permit minority participation.4 If cumulative voting is permitted, the total number of votes that each shareholder may cast is determined first. This is usually calculated as the number of shares (owned or controlled) multiplied by the number of directors to be elected. With cumulative voting, the directors are elected all......

Words: 12686 - Pages: 51

Premium Essay

Managers and Directors

...Managers and Directors Managers and Directors who are at least 10% of a class of equity securities registered under Section 12 of the Exchange Act, as determined by voting or investment control over the securities pursuant to Rule 16a-1(a)(l) (“ten percent holder”) (Form 3 Initial Statement of Beneficial Ownership of Securities, 2003). They are responsible for their filings at least 10 days after an event or change in status of their company. “Persons reporting pursuant to Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act shall include information as to their beneficial ownership of any class of equity securities of the issuer, even though one or more of such classes may not be registered pursuant to Section 12 of the Act” (Form 3 Initial Statement of Beneficial Ownership of Securities, 2003). “Other material items concerning management that should be disclosed include (1) all forms of remuneration (including stock options and warrants) to which management is entitled; (2) the type and amount of securities of the company currently held by management which also should be expressed as a total percentage of ownership of the company and (3) transactions between the company and management (The Role of Disclosure in a Securities Offering, 2010). Managers and Directors bear the most responsibility when it comes to ensuring quality, fairness and accuracy for securities offerings. They are responsible for the company and its offerings. Investment Bankers Investment bankers are gatekeepers for......

Words: 743 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Director

...managers who were leading the way forward 100 years ago? Managers in the early 1900s had very few external resources to draw upon to guide and develop their management practice. But thanks to early theorists like Henri Fayol (1841-1925), managers began to get the tools they needed to lead and manage more effectively. Fayol, and others like him, are responsible for building the foundations of modern management theory. Background Henri Fayol was born in Istanbul in 1841. When he was 19, he began working as an engineer at a large mining company in France. He eventually became the director, at a time when the mining company employed more than 1,000 people. Through the years, Fayol began to develop what he considered to be the 14 most important principles of management. Essentially, these explained how managers should organize and interact with staff. In 1916, two years before he stepped down as director, he published his "14 Principles of Management" in the book "Administration Industrielle et Generale." Fayol also created a list of the six primary functions of management, which go hand in hand with the Principles. Fayol's "14 Principles" was one of the earliest theories of management to be created, and remains one of the most comprehensive. He's considered to be among the most influential contributors to the modern concept of management, even though people don't refer to "The 14 Principles" often today. The theory falls under the Administrative Management school of......

Words: 4170 - Pages: 17

Premium Essay

Board of Directors

...Memorandum To: Board of Directors From: Date: 3/1/15 Re: Corporate Culture Purpose Due to recent issues involving your last CEO I recommend you evaluate and clearly define the role of the board of directors as well as the roll of the CEO. The role of the board is to ensure that your organization is accomplishing its mission by developing policies that guide the operation of organization and by monitoring the finances of the organization. Role and Authority of Board Member and/or Board Officer The Board needs to be focused on governance of the organization, which is accomplished through policies. Responsibilities of a Board Member • SELECT THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR • Support the Executive and review his or her performance • Ensure effective organizational planning • Track progress toward meeting the results defined by the strategic plan • Provide for the availability of adequate resources • Oversee the effective management of resources Code of Conduct Chief Executive officers and Managing Directors should be responsible for setting the tone for ethical conduct for the company and ethical conduct should be made known to all employees. Recommendations: • Top management needs to consistently set the tone as they will be held accountable when something goes wrong, all employee’s need to know their responsibilities and to be ethical in their conduct. • Communicate, communicate, and communicate. Communication is key and discussions are...

Words: 331 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Athletic Director

...Overview An athletic director (commonly "athletics director" or "AD") is an administrator at many american colleges and universities, as well as in larger high schools and middle schools, who oversees the work of coaches and related staff involved in intercollegiate or interscholastic athletic programs (ehow.com). They are in charge of an athletic department at a high school, college or university and at some colleges, the athletic director may hold academic rank. They are usually considered to be full-time administrators instead of, full time faculty members. Although technically in charge of all of the coaches, they are often far beyond well-compensated and also less famous, with few having their own television and radio programs as many coaches now do. In this paper I plan to describe the duties of an athletic coach, career paths, educational requirements and benefits of becoming an athletic Director. Athletic Director Job Description The Athletic director oversees funding and budgets for school athletic programs and are responsible for ensuring that the various teams at a school receive a fair distribution of resources. They may have to make tough decisions about how to allocate money. They work with coaches to ensure school and division regulations are being followed but don't usually handle the direct coaching and training of athletes. However, they usually oversee the hiring and firing of trainers and coaches. In addition to managing......

Words: 1173 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Director

...capacity and encourage individuals to act upon it – to lead small teams of people and apply that leadership in business” (Little, 2008). West Central is a human service organization that serves the low income. Most of our staff that has direct client contact are very compassionate people, but, lack the leadership skills to properly guide the staff they supervise. We also have a number of staff that have been promoted and are now in a supervisory position, and while their skill set for completing the mechanics of the jobs is there, the leadership component is missing. As identified by Little, we need a leadership program that will harness the staff’s leadership capacity so they can lead. Objectives In an interview with the Executive Director of West Central, the objective of the leadership development program would be to enhance leadership skills for the participants by providing appropriate activities, experiences, training to increase the probability of success for each participant; establish a peer coaching network that involves the participants and West Central’s management team and provide ongoing assessment of the progress of the program as well as an assessment of the success of the program overall. These objectives would be accomplished over a five month period and would consist of planned activities, training sessions, peer-networking and journaling. Intensive two day sessions would be held every month at the main office and the program would be administered by......

Words: 1104 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

Athletic Director

...School athletic director. In preparation, I have obtained an internship with Brian Thomas at Northern Guildford High School. During my internship I am going to shadow Brian to see exactly what being an athletic director entails. Also, I am going to ask him questions about his journey in becoming an athletic director.  My goal during my internship is to first, see what Brian does day by day, as I believe there is not a typical day for an athletic director. From what I understand, athletic directors do something different every day, whether it's budgeting, fundraising, planning home games and away games or prepping fields. Next, I plan to see where Brian started his career. I understand it's difficult to become an athletic director right out of college. It will be beneficial to see where he started and what kind of experience he obtained. Through my research, I have found, some athletic directors need a master’s degree. In addition, I am anxious to see how he budgets the allowances for things like team uniforms without favoring one team over another. Lastly, I hope to get enough insight and experience of what being an athletic director fully entails, to my decision of pursuing a career in this field.  I am very excited to start my internship and I am ready to adapt to the change of working and no just going to school. I am going to take in, and learn as much as I can when working with Brian.  I am eager to finish school and start my career, whether as an athletic director or......

Words: 336 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Directors Daughter

...   The Directors Daughter   Browne and Keeley’s Method   What is the issue? The Issue in this case study is that the MMI’s purchasing manager Zoe Apse is unsure of what recommendation she should make between two suppliers (Tabitha's Tablecloths or Loretta’s Linens) due to the CEO’s interest in Tabitha’s Tablecloths. What are the reasons? Tabitha Tablecloths is a new company and is owned by the daughter of a member Clark Foster who is sitting on the board of directors. Loretta’s Lines is the current supplier and is well suited to handle the MMI’s large order. Andrew Manning (CEO of MMI) was elected with the help of Clark Foster. So instead of just referring Tabitha the purchasing manager, he showed a special interest in Tabitha’s Table cloths. What are the value assumptions and descriptive assumptions?   Value Assumptions * The assumption that Tabitha cannot handle the company’s order.   Descriptive assumption * MMI must have a supplier for linens no matter who they choose business will continue as usual. What significant information has been omitted? In this situation there are a few details that are indeed omitted. Whether or not there are any other vendors to be considered for a better business decision. The case study doesn’t specify if the purchasing manager has the final say as to what company gets MMI’s contract.  Since both companies have similar pricing, is the only determining factor how long the company has been in business? We also do...

Words: 1054 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

Directors Duties

...Section 228(1) of the Companies Act 2014 details the eight fiduciary duties directors of companies are obliged and compelled by law to comply with. The question is why it is necessary through the application of law to limit director’s decision making responsibility. The potential for directors to abuse their positions of power with regards to company’s assets in the daily running of the company seems limitless even when directors are in their own perception acting bona fides with regards to their decisions. Section 228(1) is so important and appropriate to business law as Directors are persons who according to Callanan(2007,p207) ‘have been entrusted with powers for the benefit of others’ but the potential to damage one person or persons to benefit another is so highly possible that the law is compelled to control directors decisions. Section 228(1) (d) addresses a directors duties ‘to not use the company’s property, information or opportunities for his or her own or anyone else’s benefit’. The case of Regal Hastings v Gulliver (1942) is one which has involved much debate throughout the years. The directors of Regal although acting in their opinion bona fides, through holding a position as directors were privy to information that, had they not held their position as directors would not have been able to benefit from the transaction that they undertook. The key point behind this case was that directors are exposed to sensitive and sometimes exclusive information and such......

Words: 2154 - Pages: 9

Free Essay

Directors

...topic Directors of Company While engaging ourselves in making this report, we gained useful information related to the procedures of election of directors and also find the eligibilty criteria for the election of directors other issue related to director of company. We have worked hard in making this report. We hope that it will fully serve its purpose. We appreciate your support in making this report and we also look forward to your feedback which will be helpful for us. Please check the enclosed report. Sincerely, Syed Abid Haider Mohammed Waqas Manzoor Encl. (1) LETTER OF ACKNOWLEDGEMENT All thanks to Almighty GOD, who is most merciful, who granted and helped us to work on this report. We would like to express our gratitude towards our parents for their kind co-operation and encouragement which helped us in completion of this report. We would also like to extend our gratitude towards our faculty Mr. Muhammad Zia Kayani, who gave us an opportunity to do a research and to make a report related to our course outline. We have made a report on Directors of Company Respectfully yours, Syed Abid Haider (12784) Mohammed Waqas Manzoor (12782) TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 1 2. LETTER OF ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 2 3. TABLE OF CONTENT 3 4. DEFINITION OF DIRECTOR 4 5. KINDS OF DIRECTORS 8 6. APPOINTMENT OF FIRST DIRECTOR 11 7. ELECTION OF DIRECTOR 14 8. METHOD OF VOTING 17 9. LOANS TO DIRECTORS 19 10. POWERS AND DUTIES OF DIRECTORS 23 11...

Words: 4829 - Pages: 20

Free Essay

Duties of Directors

...Directors of a company normally have exclusive power to manage the company’s business and exercise its powers. At common law, the duties were owed to the company, to employees, to individual shareholders and creditors. 1.0 Duties of Directors to the company It is convenient to categorise the duties of directors into fiduciary duties which arise because they are quasi-trustees of the assets of the company. The word ‘fiduciary’ refers to trust and confidence. ‘A fiduciary is someone who has undertaken to act for or on behalf of another in a particular matter in circumstances which give rise to a relationship of trust and confidence’(Bristol and West Building Society v Mothew [1998] Ch1 per Millet LJ at p.18). Fiduciary duties of the directors of a company considered are imposed on them by equity for the protection of the persons for whom they act. Directors’ fiduciary duties are mandatory element of company law; they are imposed by the courts all directors of all companies. A director of a company holds an office not an employment, and is on duty all the time while holding the office: there are no off-duty hours when the director is free from his or her fiduciary duties (Gwembe Valley Development Co. Ltd v Koshy [1998] 2 BCLC 613) Some people argue that that is inappropriate to apply the concept of a fiduciary, which is derived from the concept of trustee, to company directors. Trustees are supposed to be prudent, risk-averse people whose priority is to preserve the capital......

Words: 620 - Pages: 3