Different Schools of Psychology to the Advancement of the Field of Psychology

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By jerome1
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Different schools of Psychology to the advancement of the field of Psychology

Psychology began or has its roots in philosophy, the mother of all sciences. Aristotle in his works speaks rather remotely on different aspects of psychology. Among some of Aristotle’s major and famous works namely metaphysics, De Anime; he speaks of the soul which in profound consideration could come to the conclusion that it sounds synonymous with our modern understanding of ‘mind’. Thus psychology was a part of philosophy from the very beginning through it stands independently now. Further long before Aristotle existed; philosophers like Thales, Pythagoras, Heraclites and Parmenides spoke on the same subject even though it was not that much elaborated. Here we cannot forget the contribution made by Plato. He very clearly explains in his dialogues further on this matter. Psychology originated very simply as a result of the development of the metaphysical approach of the people of different times. In sociology it is an acceptable fact that the prevailing circumstances and state of a particular social milieu make a great impact on a particular matter. This impact varies from place to place time to time depending on the social characteristics. By inferences the aforementioned is the reason why there are different schools in psychology. When we analyses it stands to reason that all psychologists were trying to deal with the same matter. They have seen the same problems or the issues with regard to ‘mind’ in different angels. Among all the schools introduced, there are a few that appears bold. They are namely structuralism, functionalism, behaviorism, psychoanalysis, humanistic, gestalt’s psychology, cognitive….Here it is rather important that we have a run down on each school separately.
When psychology was first established as a science separate from biology and philosophy, the debate…...

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