Defi

In: Social Issues

Submitted By kval25
Words 931
Pages 4
In the southern region of New Jersey there are many small suburban towns, one including Woodlynne. Woodlynne is an extremely small town and is very often overlooked due to its size. Woodlynne is a residential area even though the surrounding towns are rich with businesses. Currently the council people and local government are working on creating more business within the small town in order to draw more people. Woodlynne is made up of many different types of people, homes, and small businesses and had an extensive history behind it. Woodlynne is made up of about 2,686 people as recorded in 2009; it is a very small town ("Woodlynne, new jersey," 2011). It is said that the population has decreased 5%, but that can be a result of the recession and the increase in taxes. The income per capita in Woodlynne, New Jersey is approximately $19,682. Woodlynne is very diverse and is made up of 48% White or Caucasian, 23% African-American, 12% Asian, 1% Native American and 16% Other/Mixed ("Woodlynne, nj profile," 2011). The town is made up of %51 females and %49 males. The estimated median income in 2009 was $49,594 which was an increase from the previously recorded $39,138 in 2000 ("Woodlynne, new jersey" 2011). After analyzing the average income, as defined by socioeconomic status levels, Woodlynne is considered a middle-class neighborhood. Although a fairly small town, the government body of Woodlynne was more of a Republican-Conservative position. This has changed with the election of a Hispanic mayor, Jerry Fuentes. He is much more focused on creating programs within the township to better the youth and keep adolescents off of the streets. He has a proactive standing in attempting to reduce crime, because although Woodlynne is a small town it is high in crime which can be a result of being closely neighbored to Camden city (one of the highest crime cities). Woodlynne is…...

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