Cja234

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Submitted By kaui89
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Michael Milken and Manuel Noriega
Michael Milken is guilty of 6 counts of security fraud. His brother, Lowell, who was involved was accused of wrong doing. His grandmother was being interviewed about Michael’s business. With a lot of pressure being put on his family, the government gave him an option to plead guilty to these tax and security fraud with a payment of $600 million and in return, they would drop the charges on his brother.
April 1990 Milken agreed to the charges. Meserve (2012), “Three of the charges were linked to the convicted inside trader and arbitrager Ivan Boesky. He was also banned from the securities industry” (para. 22). Initially, he was supposed to serve 10 years in prison but because some of the financers didn’t found his guilty he ended up serving 22 months in federal prison.
1991 In 1991, the governments estimated the charges of $4,7 million but the federal judge said it was $318 million. He was then released in 1993.

(Meserve, 2012)
In comparison and contrast to Manuel Noriega, former leader of Panama, he was sentenced to 30 years in prison for smuggling cocaine in 1992. He was charged 8 counts of multiple felonies. “Convicted in federal court in Miami of turning Panama into a transshipment point for Colombian traffickers smuggling cocaine to the United States” (Jolly, 2010, para. 4). Noriega was charge for multiple counts. After serving federal prison in 2010 he was sentenced 7 years in prison for money laundering by a French judge and forfeit $2.9 million from his bank account. 1999 he was charged with laundering of $3 million for drugs and sending money through international banks and into the French bank accounts. In Panama he was also charged for setting someone to murder the political opponents along with embezzlement and corruption.

(Jolly, 2010)

Reference:
Jolly, D. (2010, July 7). Manuel noriega. New York Times.…...

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