Central Line Bloodstream Infection

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Submitted By jadenaa
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Nosocomial central line bloodstream infections are becoming one of the lead causes of death within hospitals (Smith, Egger, Franklin, Harbrecht & Richardson, 2011, p.1038). A blood stream infection is defined as having a positive blood culture while central venous access is in place without any further evidence of infection related to the patient’s comorbidities (Smith, et al., p. 1038). Organisms that are known to cause these infections include staphylococcus aureus and enterobacteriaceal (Curry, Honeycutt, Goins & Gilliam, 2009, p.151). It is concluded that one in ten patients experience an adverse event such as a central line bloodstream infection during their stay at the hospital (McPeake, Cantwell, Malcolm & Malcolm, 2012, p. 123). Furthermore, it has also been researched that over fifty percent of those cases could have been avoided if there were increased patient safety processes that were followed strictly and routinely evaluated for effectiveness (McPeake, et al., p. 123). Recent changes in government and insurance reimbursement suggests the elimination of payment for central line bloodstream infections especially when proven to be obtained during their hospital stay (Duane, Brown, Borchers, Wolfe, Malhotra, Aboutanos & Ivatury, 2009, p.1166). Hospital charges for central line infections increase the cost of stay nearly threefold (Duane, et al, p. 1166). The invasive nature of the catheters insertion predisposes patients to infection and it is healthcare professional’s responsibility to search out and implement evidence based practice that could prevent additional harm (Duane, et al., p. 1168). The general community has become more aware of people being harmed by the very place and professionals they are supposed to feel the safest, and are demanding lifesaving changes (McPeake, et al., p. 123). Even though the prevention of central…...

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