Business Negotiations

In: Business and Management

Submitted By Sheeri
Words 948
Pages 4
This week’s case study tells us about Michael Bloomberg and the New York teachers union. It tells us that “In 2010, New York State passed a law that required its school districts to develop more stringent teacher-evaluation systems. Local school districts and their unions were assigned a task for specifying certain criteria of their new systems by January 17, 2013. New York City was going to receive benefits of $250 million in aid and another $200 million in grants if the agreement was reached on a new system, a 4% increase in state aid. However, as the January 17th deadline approached, Bloomberg and New York Teachers’ Union were not even close to reaching an agreement.” Our assignment wants us to design a strategy using a win-win situation for both parties and also to “Identify the four steps of Integrative Negotiation Process, and conduct analysis of how these four steps might help you in designing your negotiation strategy.” I am going to discuss the four steps of Integrative Negotiation and how they might help me in designing my negotiation strategy.” The first step is the compromiser, the one who always wants to split the difference, according to our lecture, this strategy works well when that statement is delivered at an appropriate time. However, the problem comes when the difference is split at the wrong moment and the end result is not a number or outcome that ultimately makes sense for one or both of the parties involved. . This step I will save for last in the negotiations, due to the fact that our case study tells us that “Bloomberg and New York Teachers’ Union were not even close to reaching an agreement” and the deadline almost upon them. We can pretty well see that an extension is needed on the amount of time. Then there is the accommodator, who is likely to have an innate focus on the interests of the party sitting across the negotiating…...

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