Briefly Describe the Importance of the Interaction Between the Respiratory and Cardiovascular Systems in Maintaining the Body’s Internal Balance

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The cardiovascular system can be broken down into two words 'cardio' or 'cardi' meaning heart and 'vascular' meaning blood vessels Roberts, (2010). The cardiovascular system is also known as the circulatory system Roberts, (2010). The whole meaning cardiovascular system can be explained as a system consisting of the heart, blood vessels, arteries and veins which carry blood around the body and takes oxygen and nutrients to the body tissues and removes wastes products from the tissue cells Roberts, (2010) that make up the body’s other ten systems. These consist of Integumentary (skin, nails and hair), skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine (hormones), lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive The cardiovascular system depends on all the systems above functionally normally as it is the body's key transport system Peters, (2004) The Respiratory system consists of the upper and lower respiratory tracts and thoracic cage, it also consists of the nose, the pharynx, trachea and our lungs Peters, (2004) where in addition to the maintaining exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the lungs and tissues, the respiratory system helps regulate the body’s acid base balance Peters, (2004).
Every cell in the body needs oxygen to help release energy into the body Sang, (2005) and needs to get rid of waste product such as carbon dioxide to function; the respiratory
System allows this to happen by breathing air into the lungs allowing the cardiovascular
System to transport the oxygen and carbon dioxide between the cells and lungs
Sang, (2005).
The heart and the circulatory system (arteries and veins) make up the cardiovascular system; the heart is the pump which ejects blood to all organs, tissues and cells of the body Chapunoff, (2010).

Oxygenated blood provided by the heart helps keep all the vital organs alive with the help of the respiratory…...

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