Behaviorism V. Psychoanalysis

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By nehlen1
Words 899
Pages 4
Psychology is a relativly new field in all of the sciences, only about 130 years old.(Ciccarelli,White, Psychology third edition) Some new theories have emerged because of dissatisfaction of older ones. As an outcome every system of psychology different motives and differing perspectives on what is fact and what is not, therfore the using of different research methods, tachniques and goals defines what each system views the truth. This will be eximined through the examples of Behaviorism and Psycoanalysis. Two different examples of psychology.
Behaviorism and psycoanalisis both have evolved out of unique social and intellectual cvontexts. Psychoanalisis is arguably the most influential system of psychology. It was pioneered by Sigmond Freud in Vienna during the 19th century. During this time various social trends were in operation. These were the creation of the German School, anti-semitism and the role of woman is society. All of these things impacted Frteud for instance the German school provided the basis for his treatment situation and anti-sematic polices forced him into the medical profession. Freud was also influenced by several individuals, Josef Breuer, Jean-Martin Charcot and Rudolf Chrobak. All three of these individuals had radical views about the role of sex in neurotic disorders. For example Breurer once said that "neurotic disorders were always concered with secrets of the marital bed". These views were influenced Freud as did Breuers former patient Anna O. Through his sessions with her he developed free association, one of the main factors of psychoanalysis. Freud comparedthe human personality to an iceberg. The small part that shows above the waterrepresents conscious experience and the larger mass below water represents the unconscious, a storehouse of impulses, passions and inaccessible memories that affect our thoughts and behavior. This is the…...

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