Art and the Human Condition

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Submitted By delmacam
Words 1539
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The Palette of Narmer The Palette of Narmer, also known as the Great Hierakonpolis Palette is an ancient Egyptian artifact dating from the 31st century BC. The palette depicts the unification of upper and lower Egypt by Narmer, the first pharaoh of Egypt. On one side Narmer can be seen wearing the white crown of upper Egypt, wielding a mace in one hand and striking a captured prisoner with the other. Beneath Narmer, are what seem to be a pair of dead bodies and a hieroglyphic sign that most likely indicates the name of a defeated town. The other side of the palette depicts Namer wearing the Red crown of lower Egypt with the decapitated bodies of enemy troops sprawled out to the side.This portrays Namers victory over his enemies and his unification of the two crowns under a single man. Beneath the king are two large serpopard’s, a mythical hybrid between a lioness and a serpent. Both upper and lower Egypt worshiped these creatures and the intertwining of their necks is an additional representation of Egyptian unity under Narmer. At the very bottom of the palette a bovine image is seen knocking down the walls of a city, further commemorating Namers military victory. This ancient artifact displays the critical role of a ruthless warrior in the forming of one of the greatest civilizations in all of human history. Although human beings should always strive to avoid violence, the use of force is essential to to building complex civilization. Violence is crucial to the development of a civilization because it is not only an effective means to attain power but is also an excellent tool to demonstrate in the purest sense the authority of a regime. To build a civilization there must exist some form of government. And governments are most effective when their citizens not only recognize but obey their leadership. Therefore I would argue that governing through the use of…...

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