Art Gallery

In: Miscellaneous

Submitted By Yankee
Words 784
Pages 4
The word family brings all kinds of thoughts into a person’s mind. Family can stand for anything that has to do with a group of people that have something in common. Most people believe family has to do with blood related people or people who enter a family through marriage but there is much more to the word family than that. A family can range from two people to just about any amount of people. A family is not just started from a mother and father, a family can be teammates, fans of a specific team, people that share a common interest, or any other way of collecting people into groups known as families. In the art gallery there are a variety of ways that family is represented but there were two pieces that grabbed my attention. The first piece of art that represented family to me was by the artist Stefan Abrams. The artwork was named Dopplegangers and it was composed of seven photographs stacked on top of one another which were about two feet in width and nine feet in height. In the pictures were two people that looked similar, wore similar clothes, were doing the same action, or were fans of the same sports team. That represents family because you do not need to be brothers to be family, you can be friends that share a common interest and you are a family. All of the New York Yankee fans in this world are all a family because they cheer for the same team and when they win everyone is happy and when they lose everyone is hurt. In the expression, “you win as a team, and lose as a team” that could also be said, “you win as a family, and lose as a family” because if you are on a team together, you are family. The technique of this artwork is extremely eye catching because it is a different form of art and it is very clever. To have the thought of capturing people that are similar in some way is unique. The colors of all the different pictures go together well…...

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