Anatomy Review

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Submitted By toller307
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Microscopic muscle- periosteum diagram

-Neuromuscular junction: junction between nerve fiber and muscle supplied
-Motor unit: single motor neuron and all corresponding muscle fibers innervated -Ratio of eye – 1:6 = eye (fine control) and 1:300=gluteus maximus (very little control)

-Sarcomere: smallest contractile unit of skeletal and cardiac muscle

-Compartmentalization: grouping muscles together based on action (ex: flexor muscles, extensor muscles)

-Muscles of the neck Sternocleidomastoid Trapezius Infrahyoid muscles Suprhyoid muscles

Halicus: big toe
Pollicus: thumb (palm of your hand)

Nervous System

-Axon: away
-Dendrite: towards
Myelination: speeds up the conduction and heals nerve
-CNS: oligodendrocytes
-PNS: Schwann cells (neurolemmocytes)

-Astrocytes: star-shaped, most abundant (wrapped around capillaries)

-Synapse: where neurons communicate

-Neurotransmitters: chemicals that they communicate with

-Neurolation: brain and spinal cord form (day 20)

-Afferent: sensory; dorsal; ascending
-Efferent: motor; ventral; descending

-Spinal nerves enter vertebrae through intervertebral foramen

Cranial Nerves 1. Olfactory 2. Optic 3. Oculomotor 4. Trochlear 5. Trigeminal 6. Abducen 7. Facial 8. Vestibulocochlear 9. Glossopharyngeal 10. Vagus 11. Accessory 12. Hypoglossal

Senses

-Gustatory: taste
-Olfactory: smell
-Taste Pathway: CN VII, IX, X
-Smell Pathway: CN I
-Vision Pathway: CN III, IV, and VI -SO4: CN IV innervates superior oblique muscle -LR6: CN VI innervates lateral rectus

-Phatom pain: still have pain from a limb once it has been removed
-Referred pain: pain in your left arm if you are having a heart
- Organ of Corti: cochlea hearing
-Semicircular Ducts: rotational equilibrium
-Vestibules: static…...

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