A Thousand Splendid Suns

In: English and Literature

Submitted By VicM23445
Words 1289
Pages 6
The novel “A Thousand Splendid Suns” is about a young girl called Mariam who has many unique experiences throughout her life. In this novel the writer’s purpose is to express the message about life. The writer also wants us to think about what the main characters within the novel learn. Mostly, Mariam learned the benefits and consequences of love, and how that love can destruct or compliment a person. Along Mariam’s journey she has three unique experiences which include losing her mother, being forced into an arranged marriage and having to kill Rasheed.

At the beginning of the novel “A Thousand Splendid Suns” Mariam is a young girl who doesn’t know much about the world. The story began with Mariam who at the time is a young girl living in a small shack with her mom to which she calls Nana. Mariam’s father, Jalil is a wealthy businessman who she loves very dearly and sees nothing wrong with him because he comes and visits her every Thursday but Nana knows that he is not a good man. On Mariam’s birthday, she asks her father if he would take her to the movie theater and Jalil tells her that he’ll see what he can do. When Jalil doesn’t show, Mariam decides to go run away and go to his place. Nana tries to get Mariam to stay by threatening her, “You are nothing…..Don’t leave me…..Please stay. I’ll die if you go.” Mariam doesn’t listen to her and goes anyway, but when she gets there her father tells her to go back home and that he doesn’t want to see her. When Mariam finally arrives back home the next day she found her mother had committed suicide in the fear that Mariam which was all she had left her. She was in tears of grief and anger, but mainly tears of a deep shame at how foolishly she had given herself over to Jalil. She knew that Nana warned her that she would do something terrible if she left her but Mariam didn’t listen to her at the time...Nana was right all…...

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